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3rd swastika suspect charged

Bias_web

KEARNY – 

The third member of a Belleville trio suspected in the vandalism of vehicles at a Kearny trucking company was arrested last week on charges of bias intimidation, criminal mischief and conspiracy, Kearny Police Chief John Dowie reported.

Adonis Giron, 20, turned himself in at KPD headquarters Oct. 15 after being contacted by Det. Michael Gonzalez, chief investigator on the case, Dowie said.

His bail was set at $25,000, and he was subsequently released after posting 10%, authorities reported,

The previous week, Gonzalez and Det. John Plaugic had arrested Frederick Vangeldren, 26, and Akim Dolor, 24, both also of Belleville, in connection with the incident at Star City trucking on Third St. in Kearny.

On the morning of Oct. 3, a company manager had discovered four trucks vandalized, two of them spray-painted with swastikas. Police said Star City’s owner is Jewish.

Vangeldren and Dolor face the same charges as Giron.

Dowie noted that Gonzalez had developed the suspects after viewing security videos in the neighborhood.

All reports connected with the case have been forwarded to the state Bias Crimes Unit

– Karen Zautyk 

Check out school board hopefuls

The Belleville United Coalition will sponsor a Candidates Forum for those seeking election to the Belleville Board of Education on Monday, Oct. 27, at the Belleville Seniors Center, 125 Franklin Ave.

The event is slated to run from 7 to 9 p.m.

Robert Braun, former longtime education writer for The Star Ledger, will serve as moderator.

Five people are running for two open 3-year seats on the school board. Trustee William Freda isn’t seeking re-election and former Trustee Joseph Longo resigned earlier this year after his election to the Belleville Township Council.

BUC President Jeff Mattingly said that four of the five candidates have accepted invitations to attend the forum. They are: Gabrielle Bennett, Patricia Dolan, Erika Jacho and Ralph Vellon.

Mattingly said that candidate Christine Lamparello “has a scheduling conflict concerning giving testimony about services for the severely disabled” and is considering sending someone to represent her.

According to an announcement posted by the BUC on NutleyWatch.com, the forum “is a non-partisan event designed to give the candidates a unique opportunity to express their views and positions on a wide array of vital issues currently affecting our troubled district.”

As guests enter the Senior Center, they will be invited to submit questions for the candidates on 3-by-5-inch cards which will be collected soon after the forum begins. Braun will choose the questions which he will then present to the candidates on a rotation sequence.

The forum will be videotaped and made available to the public through the local cable access station and via internet posting.

Some background on the candidates: Bennett has served as a committee member of the Belleville High School Business Employment and Technical Advisory Council; Dolan, whose daughter is a 2013 Belleville High graduate, says, if elected, she will support teachers’ needs and “make sure the excessive, needless overspending will stop” under her watch; Jacho is a Belleville High alumna who has served as School 9 PTA president and was an unsuccessful candidate for the board in 2012; Lamparello has chaired the Belleville Special Education Advisory Council; and Vellon, a Navy veteran with two children in the public schools who has a master’s degree in nursing and is pursuing a business administration degree, says he supports “reform” of the school system and would work to give teachers “support” and “respect.”

Dolan and Vellon have been endorsed by Belleville’s Voice of Teachers in Education, a political action committee comprised of local teachers.

 – Ron Leir 

WE’VE GOT MAIL

DONOVAN GOOD FOR BERGEN

To the editor:

I support Kathe Donovan. I read the articles, and the different spin that people put on them, but the bottom line is that Kathe Donovan has done the job of county executive the way it should be done.

Do we want someone who is a pushover and turns a blind eye to abuses? Certainly not.

Donovan has made the greater good of Bergen County residents her priority.

Over the past four years, there have been hundreds of millions of dollars in savings, lower budgets, more jobs for our residents, and a reduction in bloated government. That’s a difference we all benefit from.

So, when you get a call from someone who doesn’t live in Bergen County but who wants you to vote for a candidate because of how it will benefit them, just tell them you are sticking with the person who kept her promise to the people of the county.

We have a much better place to call home now because of Kathe Donovan.

The non-residents who want to influence the outcome of this election should think about moving back here.

Annette Bortone 

Lyndhurst 

Thoughts & Views: Gov’t stumbles threat to Republic?

I always liked to think of myself as a progressive minded member of society, sympathetic to the idea that government can play a positive role in providing the greater good for the greater number of people.

Things like Medicare, Social Security, pensions all make sense to me, as safeguards against old age and infirmity, particularly as I venture into my golden years.

But if we continue to rely on Uncle Sam to have our backs, the way FDR’s reforms intended, there’s reason to believe that we may not safely make it to the Promised Land.

Just look at the revelations about how federal transportation monitors sidestepped riding herd on GM’s faulty air bags, even after taxpayers provided a nearly $50 billion bailout package to the carmaker.

Or the reports about federal highway overseers overriding state concerns about the failure of guardrails to actually protect motorists from injuries upon impact.

Seems that whenever there’s an issue that impacts the welfare of everyday citizens, it’s corporate profits that always seem to prevail with federal policymakers.

Despite admissions that it’s too design-flawed to fly, the Pentagon continues to push for billions to fund a series of F-35 Lighting II fighter jets manufactured by Lockheed.

Despite being led – until recently – by a decorated combat vet, the Veterans Administration has let down many of our ailing servicemen and women in a stateside scandal linked to administrators’ avarice.

Until Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel’s recent speech about security risks triggered by climate change, the U.S. has opposed signing any global treaties that would commit the nation to aggressively controlling fossil fuel emissions.

Federal agriculture officials have tamped down consumer advocates’ push for more rigorous inspections and enforcement of animal food processing regulations, preferring to have agribusiness look after its own operations.

Although federal regulatory agencies have signed off on banking reforms designed to prevent the creation of instruments based on high-risk assets sold to clients under false pretenses, the bankers have been granted some exemptions and compliance has been left to their own devices.

The highest court of the land has let stand a restrictive election law in Texas mandating voters to show photo ID at the polls, which, critics say, will lead to disenfranchising thousands of minorities. It has also justified a ban on citizen protest on the court’s outdoor plaza as not conflicting with the First Amendment.

One wonders if the U.S. Center for Disease Control and the newly appointed Ebola czar are up to the task of providing sufficient training for health care personnel at hospitals and airports entrusted with the unenviable job of intercepting and caring for people exposed to the deadly disease.

What lessons can we take away from these disquieting concerns? Are we wrong to put any trust in government for fear of betrayal? Should we rely only on our own enterprise to make things right for the greater good? Or, is the distance between the ideal and the reality just too wide to reconcile?

The Obama administration, or what’s left of it, will be gone before we know it, in the blink of a Beltway eye, and no doubt there will be the usual rash of books of blame by some of the folks who tried to steer the ship.

But I suspect that none of them will be able to satisfactorily explain how the elected leader of our Republic can translate good intentions to action without fear or favor of how those deeds will be perceived by a persnickety press, a chronically complaining Congress and demanding campaign donors.

In a country with so many and diverse constituent parts, it is a small miracle that anything is accomplished but I suppose the good thing about that is that between the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, there’s plenty of room to maneuver in the system.

— Ron Leir

Octoberfest in Kearny

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Photos by Karen Zautyk

Scenes from Saturday fest sponsored by veterans groups to raise money for ‘care packages’ for National Guard troops. Top r., clockwise from l: VFW State Commander Jack Kane & Jennifer Long, Kearny VFW; Nam Knights motorcycle club; Hudson County Veterans Coordinator JoAnn Northgrave, Cmdr. Long & Keith McMillan, Kearny American Legion commander; National Guard members David Williams, Leonard Wright, Karen Lema, Zuleyca Martinez & Vanessa Cabrera, The truck & flag above were courtesy of the KFD.

 

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KPD Officer Steve Montanino.

Assault suspect

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NORTH ARLINGTON – 

A 44-year-old North Arlington man has been arrested for child endangerment after “repeatedly striking” a borough 6-yearold, Bergen County Prosecutor John Molinelli reported last week.

The suspect, Alex Shenouda of Rutherford Place, was remanded to the Bergen County Jail on $100,000 bail, with no 10% option.

Authorities said the assault was reported by the principal of the victim’s school after the school nurse observed bruising on the child’s leg and back. The principal contacted North Arlington police, who notified the prosecutor’s Special Victims Unit and the Division of Child Protection.

Molinelli’s office would reveal neither the gender of the victim nor what relationship, if any, there is between the child and the alleged assailant.

Shenouda, who reportedly is married and employed as a delivery man, was arrested Oct. 10 by borough police and officers from the SVU.

Arrangements were made for the victim to be interviewed by an SVU detective at the Audrey Hepburn Children’s House in Hackensack. According to the prosecutor, the child “provided specific details” about being struck by Shenouda several times, causing the bruising.

Shenouda was charged with one count of endangering the welfare of a child.

He was ordered to have no contact with the victim or the victim’s family and also to surrender his passport.

– Karen Zautyk 

Pooches on parade in Arlington Park

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By Kevin Canessa Jr. 

Observer Correspondent 

KEARNY – 

A lot of towns — including some locally — have some kind of fall or Halloween-related festival each year. But folks from Kearny’s Urban Enterprise Zone wanted to try something different — and that is exactly what will happen this Saturday, Oct. 25, at 11:30 a.m. at Arlington Park (between Forest and Elm Sts. near Midland Ave.).

That’s where the KUEZ will host its first-ever (and, it hopes, annual) Dog Parade.

The idea came about when KUEZ Director John Peneda decided he wanted something unique and autumnal to help attract people to Kearny, in line with the mission of a UEZ. He and a few others brainstormed, and with the closest dog parade being in either Bayonne or Montclair, the decision was made to give it a try in Kearny.

“We want people to come to Kearny from other towns, and that’s why the UEZ exists — to help businesses and to attract people who maybe have never been to Kearny to shop,” Peneda said. “We want as many people as possible to know there’s a lot more to Kearny than what people might know.”

So the hope is that Kearny and non-Kearny residents alike who are dog owners and lovers will make their way to Arlington Park to enter their dogs into the “parade.”

Peneda said that the event will be more like a fashion show for dogs, with owners “parading” their dogs before judges.

“What will happens is we’ll have a stage set up near the old railroad tracks,” Peneda said. “The owners will come across the stage with their dogs — and go before judges. So it will be like a runway, something you might see at a fashion show … or a beauty contest.”

There will be two categories for the contest: Dogs 40 pounds and lighter, and dogs 40 pounds and heavier. From each category, there will be two winners: One for the best dog and the other for best dog and owner.

So what that all means is the dogs should, at the very least, be in some sort of Halloween costume. While it’s not required for the humans, those who do show up in unique costumes will have a better chance at winning some sort of prize.

“So let’s say the dog is dressed up as Batman, and the owner as Robin, they’ll be eligible for a different prize,” Peneda said. “It’s a great way for the dogs and their owners to dress up together.”

On the day of the event, it won’t just be the contest, either. There will be representatives from eateries with food for humans and pets to buy, the Bergen County Animal Shelter will be on hand, the Hudson County Sheriff ’s K-9 Unit will be there — and there will be other activities for kids and the dogs.

Plus, local photographer Diane D. Tilley will be on hand to take, for a nominal fee, photos of the dogs and their owners, the proceeds of which will be donated to the Bergen County Animal Shelter.

So it should be an allaround great day for humans and canines alike. As of late last week, 20 dogs had been registered for the parade, according to Peneda.

“As long as the weather cooperates,” Peneda said. “We’ll just have to hope for the best.”

Peneda has earmarked $7,000 for the program, including fees for event coordinator Linda Kraus D’Isa, banners, rental of sound equipment and tables, prizes and advertising, but he said he expected to come in under budget.

Advance registration is required — and all owners must be able to document that their dogs are up-todate with rabies shots and that they’re properly licensed in their hometowns. To register, visit www.kearnynj.org and visit the KUEZ’s section on the website. Or, go to the KUEZ office at the Town Hall Annex, 402 Kearny Ave.

Registration is free and it is possible, depending on how many registrants there are ahead of time, that dayof- event registration will be available.

For additional information, call the KUEZ office at 201- 955-7905.

Mid-Realty in the pink

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KEARNY – 

If you were on Kearny Ave. near the intersection at Midland Ave. on Saturday afternoon, you might have wondered about the crowd of people on the sidewalk — although all the pink ribbons and pink balloons should have given you a clue.

Folks were gathered in and about the offices of Mid-Realty, 572 Kearny Ave., for a Breast Cancer Awareness event sponsored by the agency to raise funds for two local people — a woman and a child — who are battling cancer.

“All the money will be divided between the two,” noted agency owner Jarlynn Hyde.

Photos by Karen Zautyk

Photos by Karen Zautyk

 

The first-time event was the idea of Mid-Realty agent Diane Turowski, herself a breast cancer survivor. It was held in memory of another agent, C.J. Parada, who died of cancer last year.

Every Mid-Realty agent, 50 in all, “participated in one way or another,” Hyde said.

Attendees could purchase refreshments, pink T-shirts, tote bags, bracelets and even pink hair extensions. Manicures and face-painting and temporary tattoos were available — as was a Kearny Fire Department engine for children to explore. And the KGC cheerleaders performed.

Add to that a photo booth sponsored by Investors Bank and a deejay provided by Vanguard Funding. Other sponsors included Prime Source Mortgage, First Meridian Mortgage and N.J. Lenders.

–Karen Zautyk 

You won’t go away hungry at Mama Angelo’s

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By Kevin Canessa Jr.

Observer Correspondent 

NORTH ARLINGTON – 

Some restaurants claim everything they make is from scratch. Eventually, you learn it’s not all really homemade. But the truth is, at Mama Angelo’s, everything served really is made from scratch — even the pasta — says owner Larry Angelo, a lifelong Kearny resident.

“Everything is fresh. Everything is made from scratch each day,” Angelo said. “I have a pasta maker, also, and we make sure the pasta is fresh each day too. Nothing frozen. Nothing processed. Nothing pre-cooked. Only the best ingredients.”

Angelo and hs family opened up the Italian-American restaurant in 2010. And ever since, he says he’s been thrilled to share his family’s love for cooking and food with the public.

“Every single recipe we have is a family recipe,” Angelo said. “They’re all from my mom, my dad and others in the family.”

At Mama Angelo’s, Larry says customers should expect big portions at moderate prices. And, he says they should expect to be treated as if they were guests at his family’s home.

“If you’re looking for a quick five-minute experience, like to grab a sandwich and run, you won’t get that here,” he said. “We want everyone to feel like they’re a guest at our home. It’s all about the family atmosphere here.”

Angelo and his family take the commitment to providing a family atmosphere so seriously that every single dish served must first pass a quality check by him or a member of the Angelo clan.

“It’s not leaving the kitchen unless I check it first or my mom, or dad — someone in the family,” he said. “We want to be certain everything we serve is as it should be. This sets us apart from many other places. We’re always here to ensure our customers get the very best. Most other places, the owners don’t even show up.”

Among the many dishes available at Mama Angelo’s that Larry says they’re most noted for are all their pastas, fresh meatballs and Giambotta pork chops.

In fact, if you go to Mama Angelo’s, there’s a contest for anyone to try.

Eat two of the huge Giambotta pork chops in 18 minutes, and you’ll get $18 plus a gift card from the restaurant. They’re that big — and that good — he says.

“No one has completed the task yet,” he said. “Not even close. Some have tried, but it really is a challenge.”

Mama Angelo’s is also noted for its thin-crust, brick-oven pizza. “If you really want Italianstyle pizza, this is it,” he said. Mama Angelo’s is a BOYB establishment. But that hardly matters, given the kind of experience you’ll go through at the place if you give it a try. There’s seating for 65 inside the restaurant, but if you prefer to dine alfresco, there’s also 20 seats outside on the patio.

“People come hungry and always leave satisfied,” he said. “What you get here is true old-world dining — and if people haven’t given us a try yet, we think they’ll enjoy what they see.”

Mama Angelo’s, at 440 Ridge Road, North Arlington, is open Tuesday and Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 8 p.m. They’re closed Mondays. For additional information, menus and testimonials, visit www.theoriginalmamaangelos.com or call 201-997-0577. Takeout and delivery from Harrison north to Wood-Ridge is available for free.

Another wake-up call by KPD

Readers of the Kearny police blotter will recall that last week’s reports included that of a township man taken into custody after he was found sleeping on the lawn at St. Cecilia’s Church on Kearny Ave. That was on Oct. 7 at 4:30 p.m.

On Oct. 15, at 2:30 p.m., Officers Brian Wisely and Kevin Arnesman found the same individual, 50-year-old Arthur Smith, in the same place doing the same thing, police said. When they awoke him, he allegedly became confrontational and told the cops, “I’ll worship God wherever I choose.”

According to police, Smith has been advised on multiple occasions that he is not allowed on the property. Wisely and Arnesman confirmed this with parish administrators, warned Smith yet again that he was not welcome and issued him a summons for defiant trespassing.

Stay tuned.

•••

Other recent reports from the Kearny police blotter included the following:

Oct. 8 

At 2 p.m., Officer Chris Levchak observed an SUV blocking traffic on Kearny Ave. at Halstead St. while the driver engaged in a conversation. The motorist, Gabriel Rubino, 42, of Kearny, was found to have a suspended license, police said, and was charged with that offense, delaying traffic and failure to wear a seatbelt.

Oct. 13 

Officer Tom Floyd, responding to a 4:30 a.m. accident at Central and Pennsylvania Aves. in South Kearny, arrived to find a 2010 Honda Accord impaled on a guardrail. When Floyd approached, occupant Franklin Garcia, 32, of Union City, reportedly inquired, “Officer, why did you stop me?”

Garcia was able to exit the vehicle, but the Kearny Fire Department had to cut the Honda off the rail.

He was charged with DWI, driving while suspended [no pun intended], careless driving and refusal to submit to an Alcotest.

Oct. 15 

A concerned citizen came to headquarters at 10 a.m. to advise police of a “heated dispute” between a man and a woman on Forest St. Det. Marc McCaffrey and Officer Rich Carbone responded and were told that the couple had entered a residence there. Upon investigation, the were able to determine that no domestic violence had occurred and that the female showed no evidence of an assault, police said.

However, in the hallway, McCaffrey and Carbone encountered Jamal Coote, 27, of Kearny, who reportedly had a strong odor of marijuana about his person and appeared to be clutching some weed. He was charged with possession of the drug and drug paraphernalia after six small bags of pot were found in his pocket, police said.

•••

At 6:30 p.m., Officer Jordenson Jean’s mobile computer alerted him to a Honda Civic with an expired registration parked near Highland and Bergen Aves. The owner, Jonathan Quevedo, 27, of Morristown, was located nearby and was found to have an outstanding warrant from Englewood, police said. He was arrested and the Englewood PD was notified.

Oct. 16 

Just after midnight, Officer Ben Wuelfing responded to a report of an accident on Rts. 1 & 9 in South Kearny. When he arrived, Officer Jack Corbett, on Pulaski Skyway traffic duty, advised him that a 2008 Ford was stuck atop a highway divider. Wuelfing interviewed the driver, Shonett Colbert, 38, of Linden, who said her car had been hit from behind by another, which fled.

Colbert’s stranded car, however, was not the extent of her troubles. She was arrested for driving while suspended [no pun, etc.] and on a warrant from Jersey City.

Police were able to identify the other vehicle and its owner has been mailed summonses for careless driving and leaving the scene.

–Karen Zautyk