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Nicastro new Nutley girls’ volleyball coach

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By Jim Hague

Observer Sportswriter

After a successful career as the head girls’ volleyball coach at Cedar Grove High School, Cristina Nicastro decided it was time for a change.

So Nicastro took a similar position at Nutley High School.

“It was very difficult to leave,” Nicastro said. “I couldn’t have asked for a better team. The parents, the administration, the community were all great. It was very hard to walk away from a program that I helped to build. We were pretty strong and I was looking forward to continuing with that.”

But last year, Nicastro took a job as a permanent substitute teacher at Nutley and things changed.

“I’m in the process of getting a certification to become an English teacher,” Nicastro said. “I started subbing in Nutley and I found it to be so motivating.” In fact, part of the motivation came from hearing the voice of athletic director Joe Piro.

“I listened to him on the loud speaker making the daily announcements and I was so impressed,” Nicastro said. “I sought him out in the building and talked to him. I just wanted to talk to him about sports. I wasn’t thinking about leaving Cedar Grove at the time, but I guess through that exchange, things progressed.”

The 28-year-old Nicastro, a former standout volleyball player at Verona and later St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, knew then that she wanted to move on to Nutley. In fact, she already had moved into the township.

“It was a perfect fit for me as a coach,” Nicastro said. “I couldn’t have asked for a better situation.”

Nicastro was introduced by Piro to the parents and the team in May and the response was tremendous.

“The turnout was amazing,” Nicastro said. “It was more than I expected. In fact, it was overwhelming. From that moment on, they were all behind me.”

Some 40 prospective volleyball players attended the initial meeting. Nicastro never had those numbers at Cedar Grove.

Nicastro then enrolled her new team in the Bloomfield summer league.

“It was just to get a feel of what we had,” Nicastro said. “We are also having open gyms every Tuesday night. I’m overwhelmed with the interest. The more girls that we have interested, the better the program can be. I am very pleased with the turnout.”

Nicastro and her assistant coach Jenna Dwyer, a Nutley product, have been monitoring the progress of her players.

“We have a lot of volleyball players in the district,” Nicastro said. “I want to be able to establish a winning volleyball culture in Nutley. I love the game and know the game. I feel like I can establish that in Nutley.”

Nicastro said that the open gym has featured girls who never played volleyball before to the returning players. The competitive Bloomfield league has been limited to those who played in the program last year.

“But the girls are so interested,” Nicastro said. “They’re out on the court and trying hard. It’s great. It’s been a little time consuming, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

Nicastro only has two returning starters and six returning players from last year’s Nutley team that posted a 10-6 record.

“We’re changing everything,” Nicastro said. “We’ve introduced all new rotations. The girls seem to be very happy and I’m happy with their performance. I would like them to understand that volleyball is a mental sport. We are trying to simplify everything.”

Nicastro believes that the Maroon Raiders will have to be a defensive-minded squad this season.

“From what I’ve seen, we have to be a defensive team, so the main focus will be to get in the swing defensively,” Nicastro said. “If we focus on defense, I think it can pay off in the fall. We’re setting the tone for a very successful season.”

Nicastro said that she comes from a family that is totally involved in sports.

“My family is so involved,” Nicastro said. “My father comes to everything. My brother is now so ingrained in volleyball that he offers me tips. They are my biggest supporters. They’ll be at all the matches.”

Nicastro is excited about her opportunity at Nutley.

“I think it’s something that is very fitting,” Nicastro said. “It all fits well. Nutley is a great community with great people. I am looking to make my home here. I couldn’t ask for anything more.”

Lots of learning and fun at Kearny girls’ hoop camp

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By Jim Hague 

Observer Sports Writer 

Jaeli Torres is a 12-year-old resident of Rutherford. Her father and uncle were basketball standouts during their heyday at Rutherford High School, so it would be only natural for young Jaeli to want to learn about the game like her dad and uncle.

“My uncle set the record for most points there, so basically, I had no choice,” Torres said.

So in order to learn more about basketball, Torres came to Kearny recently to attend the Kearny High School Girls’ Basketball Camp. It’s been a fixture for the past decade at the school, run under the guidance and leadership of Kearny head girls’ basketball coach Jody Hill.

It was a beneficial week for Torres.

“I learned how to do most of the drills,” Torres said. “I learned how to do things in basketball with the older girls. I liked that. I took some hits, but it made me pick myself back up and get back out there. It was a lot of fun.”

That was the basic premise of the week. The 75 or so young ladies who attended the week-long camp got to learn a lot about the fundamentals of basketball, but had fun in doing so.

Carley Martin is an aspiring 11-year-old standout from Roosevelt School in Lyndhurst. Her father, Chuck, was the long-time head boys’ basketball coach at Lyndhurst.

“I learned how to do the weave drill,” Martin said. “I learned how to attack the front foot in playing one-on-one. I liked that they let us help the little girls with their shooting. I love basketball. It’s my favorite sport. I practice it every day.”

Ally Scrimo of Kearny was excited.

“I’ll be turning eight on Saturday,” proclaimed Scrimo, a student at Schuyler School in Kearny. “I learned how to jab step here. I feel like it’s made me become a better player.”

Ten-year-old Lindsay Chesney, a Kearny resident and a student at Garfield School, agreed.

“I’ve learned how to become a better player one-on-one,” Chesney said. “The camp has encouraged me and made me want to play more. I came here last year and wanted to come back, because I like basketball a lot.”

Kasey Vasquez is a promising 12-year-old from Harrison’s Washington Middle School.

“I learned a lot about ball handling,” Vasquez said. “I like to play guard, so this makes me more polished.”

Vasquez was excited to learn that Coach Hill was once a product of Harrison and went on to become one of the greatest players in the history of Harrison High School and a member of the Hudson County Sports Hall of Fame.

“That makes me even more impressed,” said Vasquez, who didn’t know about Hill’s background. “That can basically help my life, knowing I can be like her.”

Photo by Jim Hague The entire group of young ladies who participated in the Kearny High School girls’ basketball camp pose with head coach and head instructor Jody Hill (c.).

Photo by Jim Hague
The entire group of young ladies who participated in the Kearny High School girls’ basketball camp pose with head coach and head instructor Jody Hill (c.).

 

Cheyanne Iverson (no relation to former Philadelphia 76ers great Allen Iverson) is a 12-year-old from Lincoln School in Kearny.

“This is the fifth year I’m coming to the camp,” Iverson said. “I love coming. It’s a lot of fun.”

Iverson was asked if she wanted to have the nickname of “The Truth,” like Allen Iverson.

“I don’t like that name,” she said. “I learned about moves and weaves. I feel like I’ve become a better player here.”

Like Iverson, Skyler Matusz is a 12-year-old student of Lincoln School in Kearny.

“I definitely learned a lot about ball handling and that helped me a lot,” said Matusz. “I’m a guard and that helps.”

Matusz did not know that Hill was a standout guard.

“Maybe I have to listen to her a little more now,” Matusz said.

Bre Costa is a 14-year-old who will be a freshman at Kearny High School in September. It was her first time at the camp.

“I learned about the camp at school,” Costa said. “I got a flier. It seemed interesting, so I decided to come.”

Costa plans on trying out for the Kearny High School team in November.

“Coming to camp made me love the game more,” Costa said. “It made me want to play more.”

That’s what Hill wants to hear – getting more girls interested in playing basketball. Hill’s camp is unique in that it is strictly for girls, ages 7-14. Sorry, no boys allowed.

“Every year, we tend to get a few compliments, because the camp is strictly for girls,” said Hill, who has had the camp ever since she became the head coach at Kearny 11 years ago. “The parents tell me that the girls love to come because it’s all girls. They all know that most places, boys dominate. This way, the girls get the most out of being here. They’re all on the same playing field.”

Hill said that she always tries to offer a little something different each year.

“I keep trying to improve it,” Hill said. “I learn as I go. I take experiences from other camps and bring them here. We’re always trying to do new things and fresh things. The counselors do a great job with that.”

Added Hill, “It’s a great feeling to see all the same faces coming back. Hopefully, it means we’re doing something right. Maybe we’ve inspired them a little to keep playing and keep coming back. We also try to make the camp as much fun as possible.”

Many of Hill’s former players return as camp counselors, like former Observer Female Athlete of the Year Janitza Aquino, currently a standout for nationally ranked Montclair State.

“We want the girls to get the most out of it,” Hill said.

Hill said that she never thought about telling the campers about her playing background.

“Maybe it’s just a modesty thing,” Hill said. “I don’t know. There’s some information about me on the flier, but I usually don’t have a tendency to talk about myself. I tend to talk about Janitza and what she’s done. I do have a tough time talking about myself. Maybe I have to do a better job of that.”

Hill said that she adores working with the younger players.

“I can see the passion and the love that these girls have,” Hill said. “When they come here, they tend to feel good about themselves. After the week is over, they come over and give me a ‘high-five,’ and say thanks. It’s very rewarding. They now come to camp, get the Kearny aspect of it and maybe they can stick with it and give it a shot in high school. We just want to make basketball fun for them.”

It sure looked like that mission was accomplished.

Hill credited sponsor AlarisHealth at Kearny, especially Bernice Marshall, for supplying the camp T-shirts. AlarisHealth provides health care services and technological innovations for post-operative care, short term rehab patients and long-term patients alike.

Local boys’ basketball teams hone skills at Kearny summer league

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By Jim Hague 

Observer Sports Writer 

The temperatures outside may be approaching 90 degrees in the hot summer July sun, but for two nights a week, things are just fine inside the Kearny High School gym, even with the fans blowing at full blast.

Kearny High School has been the host of a boys’ high school basketball summer league, with 13 different schools encompassing three counties. It has been a highly competitive and spirited league, organized by Kearny head boys’ basketball coach Bob McDonnell.

“The level of competition has been fantastic,” said McDonnell, whose own team has participated in the league.

Kearny has not hosted a boys’ summer league in several years.

“Back then, we had only six teams here,” McDonnell said. “Next year, we’re looking to expand it to 20 teams. We had some schools who got back to me a little late for this year. The interest is definitely there.”

Each team receives a regular schedule of 10 games. There will be no playoffs or league championship this year.

The Police Activity League helped to defray some of the cost of the league, as well as the boys’ and girls’ basketball camps, the boys’ and girls’ soccer camps and the girls’ basketball summer league.

McDonnell said that he also received assistance from the Kearny Board of Education to host the summer league.

“The Board of Education has been great in letting us use the facilities,” McDonnell said.

McDonnell reached out to his friends in the basketball coaching fraternity and got commitments from 13 different schools. North Arlington, Belleville and Harrison were also among the local schools to participate, along with Rutherford.

For McDonnell, it was a good chance to get to see what his new players are like.

“I only have two returning seniors, so what the league does is give me a chance to play some incoming freshmen,” McDonnell said. “We have a constant rotation of kids going in and out. Without the league, we would be unable to get any idea.”

McDonnell said that the league has served as an eyeopener.

“Some of these kids have never played on a level like this before, so it’s all new to them,” McDonnell said. “They’re working hard and doing well.”

McDonnell has been impressed with the development of Joe Sawicki during the summer league.

“He didn’t play much last year for us with the varsity, but he’s improved tremendously,” McDonnell said. “His confidence is building up. I think that will help him a lot.”

Joe Esteves is another Kearny player who has benefitted from the summer league.

“The more kids we get a chance to play on a varsity level, the better off we’ll be,” McDonnell said. “We get to see what the kids need to work on.”

North Arlington has benefitted tremendously from the summer league, winning five of its seven contests, including a solid win last week over Belleville.

George Rotondo, one of the top assistants for head coach Rich Corsetto, looks at the league as a golden chance for his program.

“We were able to get them in a full league close to home,” Rotondo said. “We lost three seniors to graduation, so we have some young kids getting some playing time. It’s a great opportunity for these kids to play together.”

Some of the basketball players have been doing double duty this summer. They have been attending football workouts in the morning, then playing basketball at night. People like Mike Paolello and Kevin Sequeira are standout basketball players who are getting ready for football season.

“Their dedication is tremendous,” Rotondo said. “This has been very good for our program. We’re getting a lot from this. It’s a great benefit.”

Edgar Carranza is another returning Viking hoop standout who will also play football this fall.

“I think playing in this league helps us out, because it gives us an idea about our incoming freshmen,” Carranza said. “They get to see what high school is like. Winning helps, but losing teaches us to be a little hungrier. It is a little tiring, going from football to basketball, but it will definitely help us get ready.”

Belleville High School coach Jim Stoeckel also believes the league is beneficial, win or loss.

“It’s great for us,” Stoeckel said. “I didn’t get hired last year until September, so there was no summer league to go on. This gives us the opportunity to have a head start. I’m not really worried about winning or losing, as long as we get better basketball wise. It’s great to get 10 games together. I can see that the kids are putting the work in to get better.”

Andre Velez is a junior on the Belleville basketball team.

“We’re getting a chance to work on team chemistry,” said Velez, a point guard. “That definitely helps. We’re getting ready for the winter now. We get to know who are teammates are and what they can do on the floor. We didn’t get a chance like this last year and that hurt us. Now, we know what we can do.”

The Kearny summer league runs Monday and Wednesday nights with games beginning on all three courts at 5 p.m. The league will run for the next two weeks.

NA’s Cordeiro named Observer Male Athlete of Year

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By Jim Hague
Observer Sports Writer

Danny Cordeiro never thinks like he’s doing anything special when it comes to playing sports. The recent North Arlington High School graduate simply went about his business and kept himself busy as an athlete.

“I try not to think too much about it,” Cordeiro said. “It never crossed my mind what I was doing.”

However, what Cordeiro was doing was carving his place permanently in the history of North Arlington High School athletics. If he’s not the best all-around athlete in the school’s history, Cordeiro is very close. For sure, he had a historic career of firsts that will never be duplicated.

Cordeiro was a superstar soccer player for the Vikings for four seasons, culminating in an All-State performance as a senior. He scored 30 goals and added 19 assists during his senior campaign, earning a scholarship to New Jersey Institute of Technology in the process.

But Cordeiro was also a phenomenal performer in track and field. Read more »

Baseball reigns supreme at Kearny Kards Kamp

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By Jim Hague
Observer Sports Writer

Sure, Kearny is known as “Soccertown, USA.” And, of course, the World Cup soccer tournament was coming to a close last week.

But for 75 local youngsters, baseball was the primary sport, as they took part of the week-long Kearny Kards Kamp at Franklin School Field.

Headed by Kearny High School head coach Frank Bifulco and assisted by a host of talented baseball instructors, the Kards Kamp gave youngsters a lot of instruction while having a lot of fun at the same time. Read more »

Nutley East Little League repeats as District 8 champions

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By Jim Hague
Observer Sports Writer 

It’s one thing to win a District 8 12-year-old All-Star Little League championship.

It’s another thing altogether to win that same district crown, one of the most competitive in New Jersey, for a second straight year.

Considering that you have to totally turn over the roster from one year to the next, it’s almost next to impossible.

But that’s what the Nutley East Little League All-Stars did last week, successfully defending the New Jersey District 8 championship the league captured a year ago.

“I’ve never seen it,” said Nutley East Little League 12-year-old manager “Tiny” Latino, a veteran of coaching Little League for almost 40 years. “It’s the first time I’ve ever seen it. It’s a big accomplishment.” Read more »

Kearny’s Kelly named Observer Co-Female Athlete of the Year

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By Jim Hague

 Observer Sports Writer 

Nicole Kelly’s incredible athletic career began at a very young age.

“I think I was four years old,” said Kelly, the recent Kearny High School graduate. “My mom put me on a softball team that she was coaching, but I was too young to play. But I was on the team.”

Kelly didn’t take long to become acclimated to softball.

“From what I remember, I hit the ball so far,” Kelly said. “The rules were that I could only run one base, so I had to stop running at first.”

Three years later, Kelly was introduced to her second sport.

“I was about seven years old when soccer took over my life,” Kelly said. “Soccer was new and exciting. I loved it. I wanted to be more active. Soccer became my sport.”

When the time came for Kelly to become involved in high school sports at Kearny, she was ready to make her mark.

Kelly became a dominant two-sport athlete, excelling in soccer in the fall and softball in the spring. As a slick kicking and passing midfielder, Kelly led the Kardinals to their fourth straight Hudson County Tournament championship, scoring 13 goals and dishing off for 19 assists for the Kardinals enroute to a surprising 21-5 record.

As a slick fielding centerfielder and lead-off hitter in the lineup, Kelly batted .300 with two doubles, a triple, 24 runs scored, 13 stolen bases and 11 runs batted in.

More importantly, Kelly was a main cog on two teams that both won Hudson County championships during her senior year, a first for the history of the school.

For her efforts, Kelly has been selected as The Observer Co-Female Athlete of the Year, the first time in the history of the award dating back to 2002 that either a male or a female shared the honor.

Last week, Grace Montgomery of Nutley was named as the other recipient of the year-end award presented by The Observer.

Kelly recently received her award from Observer general manager Robert Pezzolla.

While Kelly said that she had instant success in softball, it was not the same in soccer. “I was terrible,” Kelly said. “When I was trying out for Thistle as a kid, there was a dribbling drill and I knocked all the cones over. But somehow, I still made the team. It took me some time to get to the level that everyone else was at.”

However, by the time Kelly got to Kearny High, she was ready to make a positive impact.

“I was pulled up to the varsity at the end of my freshman year in time for the states (NJSIAA North Jersey Section 1, Group IV playoffs),” Kelly said. “By the middle of my sophomore year, I was a starting midfielder.”

Kearny head girls’ soccer coach Vin Almeida knew that Kelly had the makings of a standout player.

“She was always quick to listen and then quick to apply what she learned,” Almeida said. “She took our advice and every year, you could see how much she improved. She was always motivated and had the ability to take the instruction we gave and applied it.”

Kelly said that Almeida’s faith in her as a sophomore went a long way.

“It definitely boosted my confidence,” Kelly said. “I was starting over some of the seniors. I definitely started to play well.”

There was some thought of moving Kelly to the front line this season, but Almeida liked the leadership she provided from the midfield slot, more importantly the wing.

“She took on a greater role this year in terms of leadership,” Almeida said. “We always knew that she had her in her. She played aggressively. She was always fun to be around.”

“We lost so many people to graduation and injury, so I thought I might have to change my position,” Kelly said. “At the start of the year, everyone was a little down, so I put the team on my back a little bit to build everyone’s confidence up. Once that started happening, we started playing better. Moods changed and I think I helped the younger kids get used to playing with the varsity. I knew that I was a younger kid once and knew what they were going through.”

Kelly also realized that she had to become more of an offensive force as a senior.

“I knew I needed to be more offensive minded,” Kelly said. “It felt good to be part of three county championships in a row.”

During the off-season, Kelly worked out on her own and to get ready once again for softball. She declined to play softball as a junior in order to get ready for her final soccer season.

“I lifted and ran on my own,” Kelly said. “I went to the batting cages a lot. It was so hard to get back into softball after taking the year off. It was a big obstacle to overcome. Coach (Jim) Pickel was patient with me as I was coming back into it. I didn’t want to be one of the weaker people on the team, so that gave me more motivation.”

Pickel saw a huge change in Kelly.

“When she was a sophomore, she was quiet and did whatever you wanted,” Pickel said. “But she came back this year, she was much more of a leader. She was kind of behind after missing a year. Her timing was a little off at the plate, but defensively, she cut balls off and made plays to keep people from scoring. That was her main objective.”

Pickel said that that Kelly became a better offensive player as the season progressed. If there’s one thing he will remember, it’s her fleet feet.

“Definitely, her speed,” Pickel said. “The first game of the season, she got thrown out trying to steal home, but the last game, she tries it again and she makes it. If she doesn’t do it again, we probably don’t win the (Hudson County Interscholastic Athletic League) title. There were two different extremes.”

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Pickel also will remember Kelly’s smile.

“Personality wise, when things were going well, her smile was as wide as possible,” Pickel said.

“I definitely did better than I thought,” Kelly said. “My first thought was that I had to be a leader. I always thought of myself as a leader. Winning the county championship felt awesome, because I knew no Kearny team ever won it before. The first thing I thought was that we won two county championships this year and both against the same school (Bayonne).”

Kelly will now head off to the University of Tampa, where she will major in sports management. Friend and former classmate Aislinn Sroczynski will also attend the same school. Sroczynski will compete in cross country and track and field there. Kelly is unsure about her athletic future.

“I might try to play soccer there, but at first, I want to focus on my academics,” Kelly said. “I’m so excited about going there.”

Kelly, who is the fourth Kearny female to earn The Observer Female Athlete of the Year, joining Allyson Dyl (2008), Janitza Aquino (2011) and Stefanie Gomes (2012), was proud to be put in the same classification of the other honorees.

“It’s definitely honorable,” Kelly said. “I don’t know how to explain it. I guess I feel like I made an impact at Kearny High School.”

That’s for sure.

Lyndhurst’s Servideo gets grand send-off

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Frank “Butch” Servideo has spent most of his life involved in Lyndhurst High School athletics.

Servideo was first a standout athlete at Lyndhurst, then returned to become a coach of several sports. He was an assistant football and basketball coach, then became the head softball coach and finally spent the final three decades as the head baseball coach, winning more than 500 games, including the overall NJSIAA Group I state championship in 2008.

Servideo also served as the school’s athletic director for the last two decades.

“This is my home,” Servideo said. “I bleed blue and gold.”

Servideo figures that he spent 13 years as a student in the Lyndhurst school system, then another 42 as a coach, educator and administrator. That’s some career.

“It’s a great town,” said Servideo, who made his home in Lyndhurst with his wife Luann and children.

Servideo announced earlier last year that he was going to retire as both the baseball coach and athletic director.

Last Wednesday, Servideo’s former assistant coaches threw him a retirement party at the Fiesta in Wood-Ridge.

“It was fabulous,” Servideo said. “It was like a wedding. All the guys put it together. It was tremendous.”

Coaches Michael Rizzo, Patrick Auteri, Rich Tuero and new athletic director Jeff Radigan joined forces to organize the affair, which was attended by more than 225 of Servideo’s well wishers.

“What a great night,” Servideo said. “I couldn’t believe how many people were there. The guys who put it together all played for me, coached with me and became great family men. I was really taken aback with how many people were there. People came out of the woodwork to be there. I kept seeing people and saying, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me.’ It was unbelievable.”

Incredibly, four of Servideo’s former coaches were in attendance, guys like Arnie Perrone, Don Cavalli, Joe Ferruzza and Phil Ciarco.

“It was great to see those guys again,” Servideo said.

During the course of the evening, the Lyndhurst Board of Education decided to honor Servideo by retiring his baseball jersey No. 10. Superintendent of Schools Tracey Marinelli presented Servideo with a jersey and another will hang permanently in the school gymnasium.

“That was very flattering,” Servideo said. “I wore No. 22 and No. 10 as a player, but always No. 10 as a coach.”

Servideo went to Northland College in northern Wisconsin after his athletic playing days at Lyndhurst. He returned home to Lyndhurst after graduation from Northland and became a coach right away.

“I was 21 years old and still had hopes of becoming a professional baseball player,” Servideo said. “Jim Corino was the athletic director at the time at Lyndhurst and he said he wanted me to be an assistant basketball and football coach. I didn’t know anything about basketball. He told me to just watch him, so that’s what I did.”

In 1980, Servideo took over a fledgling softball program that had won three games the previous year. They won 16 his first season. Incredibly, 12 of the players of that 1980 team were at the retirement celebration.

“We had some 20-win seasons and some league championships,” Servideo said of his six-year stint as softball coach.

In 1986, Servideo moved over to become baseball coach and carved out a career as one of the best baseball mentors in the state.

“I had a lot of former players come back,” Servideo said. “It was really humbling. It was great to see all the people who grew into great young men and women.”

Photo courtesy Michael Rizzo Servideo with the organizers of his retirement party last week at the Fiesta in Wood-Ridge. From l., are football coach Rich Tuero, Servideo, athletic director Jeff Radigan, new head baseball coach Patrick Auteri and vice-principal Michael Rizzo.

Photo courtesy Michael Rizzo Servideo with the organizers of his retirement party last week at the Fiesta in Wood-Ridge. From l., are football coach Rich Tuero, Servideo, athletic director Jeff Radigan, new head baseball coach Patrick Auteri and vice-principal Michael Rizzo.

 

Rizzo, who recently became a vice-principal in the district, was glad to be able to honor Servideo.

“When we heard Butchie was retiring, we really wanted to do something nice for him,” Rizzo said. “To be able to do it is another thing. It was so much fun. We thought we might get 180 or so, but that’s why we went to the Fiesta, just in case we got more people. The final count was like 230. It was amazing.”

There were a handful of speakers who got up to roast Servideo.

“They really gave it to him,” Rizzo said. “It was a lot of fun. It was priceless. I really can’t put it to words. It was really rewarding.”

The group presented Servideo with a host of retirement gifts, like a new driver for his golf game, two free rounds at the famed Bethpage Black golf course and two box seats for Derek Jeter’s final home game at Yankee Stadium before his retirement in September.

“I also got free dinners from a lot of different local places,” Servideo said. “My wife and I are going to eat well for a while.”

Servideo couldn’t believe the outpouring of love.

“All the players who came back,” Servideo said. “All the girls from years ago. All the former coaches, that was really surprising. All the teachers and supervisors who have been retired for a while and came back. It was incredible.”

Servideo was asked if it will hit him that 50-plus years of his life involved with Lyndhurst athletics had come to an end.

“It probably won’t hit me until school starts again in September,” Servideo said. “It’s funny, but the other day, I went to school to give Jeff (Radigan) a set of keys and I went to use my swipe card to get in the building and it didn’t work. I couldn’t get in the building. That was a sign to me that it was over.”

Servideo said that he’s not going anywhere soon. Luann Servideo will remain an active member of the Lyndhurst school system as a teacher’s aide. He will go to Florida to work at the Florida Coast Spring Training Baseball Facility in Fort Pierce, owned by former Lyndhurst resident Vin Carlesi.

He also plans to become an active high school umpire, but will stay far away from Lyndhurst games.

“I’ll come to watch some games,” Servideo said. “I’ll be around.”’

That’s good for the people of Lyndhurst, because dedicated people like Butch Servideo don’t come around often.

They come every half century or so.

Putting pride back into Belleville football

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By Jim Hague 

Observer Sports Writer 

When Joe Fischer decided to take over the Belleville High School football program once again for a second stint, he wanted to change the perception more than anything.

“We were starting from scratch,” said Fischer, who was the head coach for four seasons from 2004 through 2007. “I had to put together a plan.” And what did that plan include?

“We had the players pick up garbage,” Fischer said.

Simple enough, no? A day after the Belleville Class of 2014 went through their commencement exercises at Belleville Stadium, Fischer had the 40 or so returning football players go to clean the stadium top to bottom.

“It shows the kids that no one is above picking up garbage,” Fischer said. “It instills pride in their surroundings, where they practice and play. They have a nice field, a nice facility that they should be proud of. And it stops them from throwing stuff on the ground.”

Fischer said that the plan showed its first signs of working when a player went up to a teacher and told the teacher that they can’t throw empty bottles on the ground.

“One of the players ran over, picked up the empty bottle and said, ‘You can’t do that,’” Fischer said. “They know that if they’re going to pick up garbage to play, then they’re going to pick up garbage. It’s that simple. I knew I had to start from scratch. I knew that these kids had no pride in their program.”

The clean-up program was a sign to the players that times had indeed changed.

“They knew that things were changing,” Fischer said.

In May, the Belleville football players picked up 25 bags of garbage from the area around Belleville Stadium. After graduation, there was more of the same.

“Discipline doesn’t work if the kids don’t care,” Fischer said. “The kids simply had no pride in their program. It is a form of discipline when they have to take care of where they spend most of their time. We have a nice field. They should take care of it.”

Fischer said that the cleanup routine has already filtered down to the players.

“I told one of the seniors, Nick Nardicchone, that if I found any bottles around, we were going to run gassers for every bottle,” Fischer said. “He made sure that there were no bottles. That’s just the way it is. I’m not a yeller or a screamer, but they are following through with what I say.”

Fischer said that he instituted a similar plan when he became the head coach in 2004.

“We had a bad locker room with old rusty lockers and animals lived there and that ran in and out,” Fischer said. “So we re-did the entire locker room and built new wood lockers. They’re still there. It’s a team building concept.”

Photos courtesy Joe Fischer Belleville football players climb the stairs at Belleville Stadium to clean the facility after graduation ceremonies recently.

Photos courtesy Joe Fischer
Belleville football players climb the stairs at Belleville Stadium to clean the facility after graduation ceremonies recently.

 

The Buccaneers were in the midst of a 33-game losing streak, the longest in the state, when Fischer took over the first time. They snapped the slide and eventually made the NJSIAA North 1, Group IV state playoffs in 2007, the last time the program reached the postseason.

Fischer said that the players received a treat in May, when 25 of the Buccaneers were treated to partake in the National Football League draft at Radio City Music Hall.

“I have a friend, Gerhardt Sanchez, who used to be the recreation director in Montclair,” Fischer said. “He ran a 7-on-7 for the NFL in Montclair. We’ve become friends. He now works for the NFL. He called me and asked if I wanted to take some kids to the draft. So we brought 25 kids.”

The Belleville gridders got to meet Giants punter Steve Weatherford and Jets running back Chris Ivory while watching the draft.

“There were coaches and general managers walking around,” Fischer said. “It was really a nice day, another day toward team building. Half of the players had never even been to New York City before. It might be only 12 miles away, but it’s totally different to them. It was such a great day. The kids are still talking about it.”

The Buccaneers might not set the world on fire this season, but there’s one thing for sure. There’s a new sheriff in town. Actually, it’s the old sheriff, but he’s making sure that things are being done the right away and being done with a sense of pride.

“We’re starting from the bottom, but we’re moving in the right direction,” Fischer said.

Nutley’s Montgomery named Observer Female Co-Athlete of the Year

7-2 Athlete_web

By Jim Hague 

Observer Sports Writer 

Grace Montgomery never thought she was doing anything special. The recent Nutley High School graduate just gravitated from soccer in the fall to basketball in the winter and outdoor track, particularly the javelin, in the spring. Just one after another. No big thing.

“During that season, whatever the sport was, I put my whole heart and soul into that sport,” Montgomery said. “In the summer, we would have captains’ practice for soccer, then I’d go play basketball in the summer league and then do running and workouts for track. Sure, it was difficult, but I had fun. I loved all three sports I played. It wasn’t that big of a deal because I had been doing them all my whole life. I couldn’t imagine just doing one of them.”

Soccer was the first sport in Montgomery’s life. Along with twin sister Meghan, the two formed a terrific twosome playing defense from a very young age, like from kindergarten on.

“They called them the ‘Twin Towers,’” said their father, William. “They were so tall and strong back there.”

“I think I was pretty good in soccer right away,” Grace Montgomery said.

Basketball then followed a year later.

“I guess I was pretty good in basketball as well,” Grace Montgomery said. “My parents were both good athletes, so that helped.”

William Montgomery played baseball and track and field at Bayonne High School, while mom Ellen played basketball at Secaucus High School and later was part of the swim team at St. Peter’s College.

“It helped that they were both into sports and got us into sports,” Montgomery said.

The javelin was the last of the Montgomery trifecta.

“I didn’t start throwing the javelin until the end of my sophomore year,” Montgomery said. “My uncle sort of mentioned that if I became good in the javelin, it would help me get into college.”

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The results were staggering. Montgomery was a standout defender on the Nutley girls’ soccer team that went undefeated in league play and won the Super Essex Conference- -Liberty Division title. She also averaged 13 points per game for the Nutley girls’ basketball team that posted a 10-2 SEC Liberty Division mark, good for second in the league.

But the cherry on the sundae was the latest. Montgomery came from way back in the pack to unleash a monstrous throw of 136 feet, two inches to become the overall state champion at the NJSIAA Meet of Champions last month. Montgomery entered the last day of competition as the 10th  seed in the entire state, saving her career best throw for last, capturing the gold. A week later, Montgomery went to the United States Track and Field High School Nationals in Charlotte, N.C., and Montgomery finished 14th out of 60 competitors nationwide.

For her efforts, Montgomery has been selected as the 2013-2014 Observer Female Co- Athlete of the Year, becoming only the second Nutley girl to receive the honor.

Former softball standout Kelly Rauco was the only other former Maroon Raider great to receive the award, getting the nod in 2006.

Montgomery is one of two recipients for the award given to the top local female high school athlete. The other Female Co-Athlete of the Year will be revealed in next week’s editions of The Observer.

“It’s incredible,” Montgomery said. “I’m pretty impressed. It’s a pretty huge deal. It’s all still pretty crazy to me. I worked so hard to get there.”

Her coaches all knew that Montgomery was someone special.

“She was a lock down defender for a team that won 18 games and won a league title,” said Nutley girls’ soccer coach Mike DiPiano. “We also reached the top 20 in the state for the first time. She never shied away from a tackle and always played a physical game. She was the stopper her sophomore year and we moved her to outside back and she never once complained about the move.”

DiPiano was asked what he would always remember about Montgomery.

“I think it’s her toughness,” DiPiano said. “She was banged up most of the time and yet, she was a three-sport athlete. I don’t know how many true three-sport athletes there are anymore. It’s a dying breed. She’s one of the last true three-sport athletes.”

Nutley girls’ basketball coach Larry Mitschow agreed.

“Grace was an unbelievable leader for us, both on and off the court,” Mitschow said. “She did a whole bunch of things for us.

She brought the ball up the floor. She was our second leading scorer. She was our top defender and she played injured for most of the season. She managed to work her way through it. She would defensively play the top player on the other team. She really was an important player for us.” Mitschow was asked what he would remember about Montgomery.

“Her personality,” Mitschow said. “She was just a joy to coach. I loved talking to her, being able to speak to her as an adult, speaking freely about anything and everything. There were no barriers between us. We jelled well right away. She was easy to talk to.”

Track coach Robert O’Dell raved about Montgomery’s accomplishments.

“She had an outstanding career,” O’Dell said. “She’s the first Meet of Champions winner we’ve had in 39 years and just the second in school history. It was a perfect ending to a great career, with the drama of the last throw. She had an outstanding season that won’t be replicated for a long while.”

O’Dell was also asked what he would remember.

“Her ability to compete,” O’Dell said. “She competed and competed and was able to pull out that clutch throw.”

Montgomery will now take her immense talents to Rowan University, where she will solely compete in the javelin. Her soccer and basketball careers seem to be over.

“It’s going to be pretty different, competing in just one sport,” Montgomery said. “But I know that if I concentrated the whole year on one sport, I could be really good. It was always about three sports, but now, I’m excited to focus on just the javelin the whole time.”

Montgomery is still undecided about a major at Rowan, but one thing is for sure: She left Nutley High School with a legacy of greatness, of determination, of playing through pain and never giving up. That’s the reason she has been selected as the area’s top female athlete – or at the very least, a share of the top billing.

We’ll learn about the other Female Athlete of the Year next week.