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‘Sticks And Stones’ provides inspiration for the bullied

 

By Jeff Bahr 

At its least effective music acts as background sound, a sort of “pink noise” that gets lost behind the grinding din of our conscious thoughts. At its best, it touches us – often in ways that we hadn’t anticipated before listening to it.

“Sticks and Stones”, a new CD released by former Harrison resident Jo-Ann Barton is aimed squarely at the latter. Through the magic of music the singer/ songwriter hopes to inspire the children of gay parents who may be dealing with bullying issues. But in a larger sense, Barton’s songs are intended for any and all who need reassurance that things can and will get better, just so long as they put one foot before the other and keep going.

Twelve years in the making, the CD has finally come to fruition. But the journey wasn’t an easy one. “My partner and I wanted to have children and I had major anxiety over it because I didn’t want my kids to be picked on or bullied for having gay parents,” explained Barton about the uncertainty that she and her civil union wife Darlene faced before having kids. “I never did anything about it (putting together the CD) until my old drummer, James Pesler, talked me into doing the project. He said, ‘What are you doing? Get off your ass and do it!’ It was the nudge that I needed. The children were my main inspiration.”

“Sticks and Stones” signals a move back to the music scene for Barton. As the proud and doting mom of two boys, Brandon, 12, and Bryan, 9, the former singer (who now works in the investment banking industry and resides in Clifton) “came out of retirement” after more than a decade to produce the collection of eight songs.

Despite her lengthy absence from the music scene, Barton’s credentials are impressive. Her last CD, “Pop and Circumstances”, spawned a number one hit song “Weekend” at college radio stations across America. In 2001, Barton released a 9/11 tribute song entitled, “Ordinary Day”. It was played at the World Trade Center during the second anniversary observance.

Barton stressed how important her bandmates were in making the CD a reality. They include Vincent Cinardo, formerly of Harrison, who Barton describes as “a very talented musician who plays everything”; Mark Radice, Barton’s “go-to guy who also plays everything – he toured with Aerosmith and wrote music for Sesame Street and Elmo,”; and Paul Ippolito, who played bass and lead guitar on a “couple of songs,” according to Barton.

The eight tracks on “Sticks and Stones” range from the light and bouncy rocker, “There for You” to the more subdued ballad, “Watch What You Say”. The aptly named title-track, Sticks and Stones, imparts a feeling of empowerment to any who have suffered the slings and arrows of others bent on bringing them down, while “We All Cry” demonstrates how quickly even the worst situation can turn around:

Sometimes life is hard

And it can tear you apart

You hold your little head in your hands

Because you don’t understand

But I can tell you a secret about this crazy thing called life

You may not want to believe it, but it changes overnight

My personal favorite – “Long Way to Go” – maps Barton’s personal search for acceptance in an oftencruel world. Much like her other inspirational tunes, the song somehow manages to remain uplifting. Given the weightiness of the subject matter, that’s no easy trick.

“Sticks and Stones” is a well-crafted rock & roll CD that not only sends out an uplifting message of hope, but is a genuine blast to listen to. “If I can help just one kid it would make it worthwhile,” says Barton about her hopes for the CD’s overall impact. “It all came from my heart and soul.”

Groups that endorse the new CD include:

Itgetsbetter.org

Collage.org

Thesuicidepreventionlifeline.org

“Sticks and Stones” can be purchased at the following locations:

ITunes, Amazon.com, and other online outlets.

Or send check or money order for $8.99 to: Magical Music Entertainment, 1360 Clifton Ave. #182 Clifton, N.J. 07012

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