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Category: News

Around Town

Belleville

Belleville Public Library and Information Center, 221 Washington Ave., offers storytime for toddlers and preschoolers beginning Oct. 8 and every Wednesday at 11 a.m. No registration is required. For more information, call the library at 973-450-3434.

All civic associations, classic cars and motorcycle clubs are invited to participate in the Belleville Veterans Day Parade slated for Sunday, Nov. 9, at 1 p.m. Those interested may contact Bill Steimel at 973-759- 4692 (home) or 973-955-7211 (cell) no later than Oct. 17.

Bloomfield 

Bloomfield Public Library, 90 Broad St., hosts the following events:

  • Join certified Hypnocounselor Kathy Lindert and learn more about using hypnosis to help manage stress, lose weight and more on Wednesday, Oct. 8, at 6 p.m.
  • Movie Screenings: “Jobs” (Ashton Kutcher) (PG-13) on Oct. 2, “Olympus Has Fallen” (Aaron Eckhart) (R) on Oct. 6, “What Maisie Knew” (Julianne Moore) (R) on Oct. 9, “Labor Day” (Kate Winslet) (PG-13) on Oct. 16, “Noah” (Jennifer Connelly) (PG-13) on Oct. 20, “The Spectacular Now” (Miles Teller) (R) on Oct. 23, “About Time” (Domhnall Gleeson) (R) on Oct. 27, “The Haunting” (Richard Johnson) (NR) on Oct. 30. All films start at 12:15 p.m.

Oakeside Bloomfield Cultural Center, 240 Belleville Ave., announces the following events. For tickets, reservations or more information, call the Oakeside office 973-429-0960.

  • Bloomfield Mandolin Orchestra performs a selection of traditional Italian music on Oct. 5 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $15.
  • Garden of Pink Dedication celebrates the center’s “Sponsor a Tulip” program for its Breast Cancer Awareness garden on Oct. 18 at 10 a.m.
  • Kids ages 3 to 9 are invited to Party with the Great Pumpkin and enjoy snacks, crafts and a chance to take a picture with the pumpkin on Oct. 18 at 11 a.m. Reservations are required.

Harrison 

Harrison Lions Club will conduct its White Cane fundraiser from Thursday, Oct. 2 to Saturday, Oct. 5, at various locations throughout Harrison. Club members will be in front of Red Bull Stadium from 4 to 6 p.m. on Oct. 5, accepting donations and old eyeglasses. For more information, visit http://e-clubhouse.org/ sites/harrisonnj/index.php or e-mail harrisonlionsclub@ yahoo.com.

Kearny

The annual Blessing of the Animals, marking the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi, will be held Saturday, Oct. 4, at 10 a.m. at the Archdiocesan Youth Retreat Center (formerly Boystown), 499 Belgrove Drive. The pets (cats, dogs, birds, goldfish, etc.) will be gathered on the front lawn by the St. Francis statue. For more information, call 201-998-0088.

Trinity Church, 575 Kearny Ave., hosts a fish, chicken and chips dinner Friday, Oct. 3, 6 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 and two for $30. Take-out will also be available. Tricky Tray will be held 8 to 9 p.m. For tickets, call Annamarie at 201-998- 2368 after 5:30 p.m. or the parish office at 201-991-5894.

Grace United Methodist Church, 380 Kearny Ave., sponsors a fair on Saturday, Oct. 4, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The church’s tea room will be open all day. For more information, call the church office at 201-991-1132.

Good Shepherd Church, 780 Kearny Ave., holds a blood drive, in conjunction with New Jersey Blood Services on Oct. 12, from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Rosary Society of Our Lady of Sorrows Church, 136 Davis Ave., sponsors an Oktoberfest on Friday, Oct. 24, in the church basement. The event includes live music and food. (BYOB). Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Admission is $25. For tickets, call 201-991-2808 or the rectory at 201-998-4616.

Kearny UNICO hosts “Wheels for Vic,” a fundraiser to purchase a power wheelchair for Kearny resident Victor Muniz, Sunday, Oct. 5, at 1 p.m., in the former Boystown gym, 499 Belgrove Drive. The $30 admission covers a raffle, lunch and live music. Muniz was paralyzed after a tree branch fell on him during a 2008 summer storm. For tickets or more information, contact Lou Pandolfi at 201-368-2409, Joseph Sgalia at 201- 998-6879, Rossana McLaughlin at 201-407-7262, or Judy Hyde at 201-991-5812. The committee also welcomes both monetary and/or gift donations for this event.

Pathways to Independence sponsors its 13th annual Walk-a- Thon Saturday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m. to noon, at West Hudson Park, Schuyler Ave. entrance. All are welcome. Proceeds benefit adults with disabilities who attend Pathways programs. Registration forms are available at Pathways, 60 Kingsland Ave. or before the walk, starting at 9 a.m. This event includes refreshments, raffles, a free T-shirt for participants donating $100 or more in pledges and much more. For more information, call Pathways Executive Director Alvin Cox at 201-997-9371, ext. 18.

A Doggie Halloween Parade and Festival, sponsored by KUEZ, is set for Saturday, Oct. 25, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Arlington Depot Park, off Midland Ave. between Forest and Elm Sts. Dogs can be registered to participate in a costume contest. Current dog license and proof of rabies vaccine are required. Forms are available at www.kearnynj.org, KUEZ, 410 Kearny Ave. or K-9 corner, 169 Midland Ave. For more information, call 201-955-7985 or email Halloweenpawrade@ kearnynj. org. All dogs either attending or participating in the festival must be leashed.

Presbyterian Boys-Girls Club, 663 Kearny Ave., is open on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Children ages 8 to 17 are welcome to use the club’s gym, pool tables, electronic games and more. The club also plans to offer a teen basketball league and monthly dances, among other activities. For more information, call 201- 991-6734.

Lyndhurst

Registration is open for a walk to benefit the American Diabetes Association set for Sunday, Oct. 5, at Riverside County Park, Riverside Ave. (entrance on Valley Brook Ave.) Participants must check in at 9 a.m. and the walk begins at 11 a.m. The event will include vendors, health seminars and activities for kids. To register, visit www.diabetes.org/lyndhurstwalk.

The first Sunday of the month free two-hour nature walk with the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission and the Bergen County Audubon Society, is set for Sunday, Oct. 5, at 10 a.m., at the Mill Creek Marsh, Secaucus. Check meadowblog. net for last-minute weather updates. You will have to sign a standard liability release that is good for NJMC/BCAS events throughout the year. To R.S.V.P., contact Don Torino of the BCAS or call 201-230-4983.

American Legion Post 139, 217 Webster Ave., announces its eighth annual Clam Lover’s Family Barbecue is slated for Oct. 4, 1 to 6 p.m. Advance tickets cost $25. Includes all-you- can-eat clams steamed and on the half-shell and much more. For tickets or more information, call the Post at 201-933-4120.

Lyndhurst Public Library, 353 Valley Brook Ave., hosts the following events:

  • Walk-in Story is open to kids in pre-k to grade 2 every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 6:30 p.m. No registration is required.
  • Fit4Kids Magic Show for children ages 3 to 10 is offered Wednesday, Oct. 15 at 3:30 p.m. Registration is required. Call the library at 201-804-2478.

The Woman’s Club of Lyndhurst sponsors a children’s Tricky Tray on Oct. 18, at the Senior Building, 250 Cleveland Ave., at noon. Tickets are $5. For tickets, call Janet at 201- 935-1208.

Lyndhurst Health Department, 601 Riverside Ave., hosts a dinner and osteoporosis seminar on Wednesday, Oct. 22, at 6 p.m., at the Senior Center, 250 Cleveland Ave. Call the department at 201- 804-2500 to register.

North Arlington

American Legion Alexander Stover Post 37 meets on Monday, Oct. 6, at 8 p.m. at the VFW hall, 222 River Road. For more information, call 201-214- 8253,

North Arlington High School Competition Cheer Squad sponsors a clothing drive on Saturday, Oct. 4, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the high school’s front entrance on Ridge Road. Clothes, coats, shoes, handbags, linens, towels, comforters, curtains and toys will be accepted.

Queen of Peace Rosary Society sponsors a Tricky Tray on Friday, Oct. 17, at 6 p.m., at San Carlo Fine Caterers, Lyndhurst. Admission is $40 and includes four-course dinner and one sheet of small prize tickets. Prizes include gift baskets, gift certificates and more. Grand prize values start at $500, which includes an iPad and much more. For more information and tickets, call Betsy at 201-997-3914 or Pegeen at 201-246-1030.

North Arlington Public Library, 210 Ridge Road, offers the following programs. For more information, call the library at 201-955-5640

  • Carole King tribute show is set for Saturday, Oct. 4, at noon.
  • The annual Friends of the Library Attic Treasures Sale is set for Saturday, Oct. 4 and Sunday, Oct. 5, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Senior Center, located behind the library.
  • Learn all about self-publishing on Tuesday, Oct. 7, at 7 p.m.
  • Attend a lecture on coin collection on Saturday, Oct. 11, at 11 a.m. • SAT practice test is open to grades 9 and up on Saturday, Oct. 18, at 1 p.m. For more information, visit http://www.formstack.com/ forms/?1774866-DWur9MjZPt.

North Arlington Elks, 129 Ridge Road, hosts a fish fry on Oct. 10 from 4 to 7 p.m. Cost is $12. Shrimp cocktail and clams on the half-shell will also be available for $5 for a half-dozen and $8 for a dozen.

The Senior Harmony Club of North Arlington sponsors a trip to Trump Taj Mahal, Atlantic City, Tuesday, Oct. 21. Cost of the trip is $25. Attendees will receive $30 in slot play and $5 for food. Non-members are welcome to attend. For reservations or more information, call Florence at 201-991-3173.

North Arlington Woman’s Club sponsors a beefsteak fundraiser Friday, Oct. 24, 7 to 11 p.m., at the Knights of Columbus hall, 194 River Road. Tickets are $40. Proceeds benefit various local charities. For tickets and more information, call Christine at 201-577-1088 or Fran Sardoni at 973-818-6421.

Nutley

Nutley Public Library, 93 Booth Drive, offers the following programs. For more information, call 973-667-0405.

  • For children: • Preschool Story Time,  featuring picture books and crafts, is held Wednesday, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, at 9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Registration  required.
  • Two-Year-Old Story Time  meets Friday, Oct.3, 10, 17, 24, at 9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Registration is required. • Play Fridays is open to all  ages to play board and video games on Oct. 3 at 3 p.m. No registration required.
  • Manga/Anime Teen Club  for grades 7 to 12 meets Friday, Oct. 3 and 17, at 3 p.m.
  • Lego Tech Club for grades  2 to 6 meets Monday, Oct. 6 at 3:30 p.m. • P.J. Story Time is open to  all ages on Monday, Oct. 6 and 20, at 7 p.m. Registration is not required.
  • Babygarten is open to 23  months and under, every Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. and includes books,  nursery rhymes and playtime. Registration is required. Only residents may attend.

For adults:

  • First Friday Films presents  “Heaven Is for Real” Oct. 3 at 2 p.m.
  • Meet Nutley’s Catherine  Greenfeder, author of “Wildflowers,” a western historical romance, on Monday, Oct. 6 at 7 p.m.
  • A Touch of Sinatra, a musical show about the life and music of Frank Sinatra is set for Oct. 10 at 7 p.m. Seating is limited.

The Department of Parks and Recreation, 44 Park Ave., offers an art workshop open to grades 1 to 6. This eight-week program resumes Oct. 11. Classes will be held Saturdays at the department. The fee is $30 per child. Class size is limited and applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Online registration is available at https://nutleynj.my.govi. com/recreation. For more information, call 973-284-4966, between 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.

The Department of Public Affairs, in collaboration with the Fine Art Alliance of Nutley, hosts the Kingsland Manor Experience on Saturday, Oct. 4, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Kingsland Manor, 3 Kingsland Road. Artists will be creating new work using various media as patrons walk the grounds of the manor. A suggested donation of $5 per person will be collected at the door, with all of the proceeds going to the Kingsland Manor.

A healthy attitude at ShopRite

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ShopRite of Lyndhurst, an Inserra Supermarkets store, and Ultra Fitness Center/ The Unique Women’s Gym recently hosted an Outdoor Exercise Extravaganza at ShopRite’s New York Ave. store.

Zumba and strength-training classes were offered to the public as part of National Cholesterol Education Month and ShopRite’s annual Partners in Caring program. Participant donations benefited Partners in Caring, designed to raise hunger awareness and funds for local food programs. As weights, the sessions used canned goods that were purchased by and collected from participants to be donated to a food drive.

Each month, ShopRite of Lyndhurst hosts a wide range of LiveRight events that are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Julie Harrington at 201-419-9154 or email Julie.harrington@ wakefern.com.

It’s been a blessing for 75 years

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By Karen Zautyk

 Observer Correspondent 

KEARNY –

On Sunday afternoon, at a Mass of Thanksgiving marking the 75th anniverary of the dedication of St. Stephen’s Church, Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda stood in the sanctuary and gazed up at the breathtaking Gothic architecture and told the congregation that what he was viewing wasn’t a parish church.

“This,” he said, “is a cathedral.”

Observer readers who have been fortunate enough to visit St. Stephen’s would agree. The soaring vaulted ceiling, the columned nave, the magnificent reredos behind the main altar, the light coming through the exquisite stained glass windows … it all lends a particular sense of grandeur to this house of worship.

Later, after the readings and the gospel — and hymns that had echoed through the building — Hebda took to the pulpit to deliver the homily, which he prefaced with the comment, “Not only does this church look like a cathedral, it sounds like a cathedral!”

But bricks and mortar and glass and marble and wood are just part of the story of St. Stephen’s. Citing “the vitality of this parish after 75 years,” the archbishop noted: “This building is only a manifestation of what it going on in your hearts.”

“We know that God is here,” Hebda said, and for 75 years “this has been a place where people could open their hearts to the Lord.”

Hundreds of hearts were opened on Sunday, for the huge church was filled for a celebration not only of parish history but, more importantly, of the common Roman Catholic faith the parishioners cherish.

Hebda was the representative of the Archdiocese of Newark at the Mass, at which more than a half-dozen other clergy officiated along with the pastor, the Rev. Joseph A. Mancini. And the Knights of Columbus Honor Guard added to the ceremonial pomp. As did the incense wafting through the nave.

It should be noted that St. Stephen’s Parish predates the church at Kearny and Laurel Aves. by four decades.

The parish itself was founded in 1899 as a mission of St. Cecilia’s Church, Kearny. In 1900, St. Stephen’s began holding services in what had been a small Methodist church on Chestnut St. in the Arlington section.

Eventually, the parish built its own church, and school, at Midland Ave. and Chestnut St. (St. Stephen’s School operated for many years before being replaced by Mater Dei Academy, which occupied the building from 2009 to 2012.)

The present church was dedicated Sept. 17, 1939, and there is a photo taken at that ceremony showing the Rev. John P. Washington leading a procession into the building.

Photo (l.) by Karen Zautyk, (r.) Facebook Interior and exterior pictures of Kearny’s very own ‘cathedral’.

Photo (l.) by Karen Zautyk, (r.) Facebook
Interior and exterior pictures of Kearny’s very own ‘cathedral’.

 

A little more than three years later, on Feb. 3, 1943, Father Washington would die in the North Atlantic — one of the Four Chaplains whose heroism would be remembered not only at St. Stephen’s, but around the world. Along with Protestant ministers the Revs. George L. Fox and Clark V. Poling and Rabbi Alexander D. Goode, the priest perished on the USAT Dorchester, which had been torpedoed by a German submarine. The Four Chaplains gave up their lifejackets, and their lives, to save Dorchester crewmembers.

St. Stephen’s was Washington’s last parish assignment before he was appointed a U.S. Army chaplain in World War II. There has long been a plaque inside the church honoring him, and now the Four Chaplains Memorial, an impressive bronze sculpture, graces the church lawn.

On Sunday, following the Mass, adults and children were gathering around that memorial — and then, more than 360 of them sat down for a picnic on the lawn. A table, running nearly the width of the grassy plot, bore a bounty of food, all of it prepared by parishioners. There would also be music, and games for the children, and even a “dunk tank.” (Alas, we could not stay for the festivities, so we don’t know who got dunked, but somehow we doubt it was the archbishop.)

We chatted briefly with Cyndie Schirm, who was arranging the food table, and we learned that the event was planned and brought to fruition by a committee of Parish Council members. Kudos to all.

The sight of the overflowing trays and bowls and casseroles brought to mind something Hebda had said in his homily. Citing the parable of the loaves and fishes (five loaves and two fishes with which Christ fed a multitude), the archbishop noted that afterwards, the disciples had gathered up the scraps that were left from the feast, and these filled 12 baskets.

“Count the baskets of God’s blessings before you,” he told the congregation at the Mass. “You should rejoice, for what a blessing this parish has been.”

In his remarks following the service, Mancini referred to a bit of popular history. The year 1939, the same year the beautiful St. Stephen’s Church was dedicated, brought, he noted, “two very important cultural events.”

On July 4, in his farewell appearance at Yankee Stadium, the dying Lou Gehrig told the crowd, “. . . today, I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth.”

And later that year, “The Wizard of Oz” was released.

“Today,” Father Joe said, “we consider ourselves to be the luckiest Catholics on the face of the earth because there is no place like our spiritual home.”

Amen.

(Editor’s note: The Giants won Sunday, didn’t they? We saw more than one Manning jersey in church. We’re not saying, we’re just saying.) 

Relic is missing from church

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By Ron Leir 

Observer Correspondent 

HARRISON – 

A sacred relic has been purloined from Holy Cross Church in Harrison, according to police and church officials. The religious artifact is believed by the church faithful to be a piece of the original Cross of Christ from Jerusalem and has been in the church’s keeping at least since its founding in Harrison in 1886, said the Rev. Joseph Girone, pastor of Holy Cross.

“We were told by [former pastor] Monsignor John Gilchrist that the relic was brought here when the church was built as a gift from Rome,” explained the Rev. Francisco Gonzalez, parochial vicar of Holy Cross and youth minister.

A Harrison PD report issued last Monday, Sept. 15, gave this account of its disappearance: On the morning of Wednesday, Sept. 11, police were called to the church on a report of a burglary. Upon arrival, officers were told that the night before, at about 7:15 p.m., a church volunteer found a stranger in the sacristy carrying one of the church’s donation collection bags.

When the volunteer asked the man what was inside the bag, he replied: “Trash.” At that point, the volunteer told the man she was going to get a priest, Father Rodriguez, and left the sacristy.

After being alerted to the situation, Father Rodriguez confronted the intruder in the rectory kitchen where the man was searching through the cabinets. When asked what he was doing, the man replied: “I’m hungry.” The priest asked the man to leave and escorted him to the rear kitchen door.

Going to the sacristy, where the man was first seen, Father Rodriguez discovered that the relic – which, according to Father Girone, had been left in its receptacle on a table to be polished in preparation for Sunday’s Feast of the Holy Cross – was missing.

Girone said the artifact is normally kept in a rectory safe but had been removed for its once-a-year cleaning. The reliquary is in the shape of a cross about a foot long encased in a brass canister with the tiny relic itself contained in a glass “eye” and is used on special occasions, such as when priests offer a blessing for the sick.

What police described as “an unknown amount of rare gems” were said to be affixed to a portion of the artifact. Father Girone produced a framed certificate of authenticity for it written in Latin and signed by James J. O’Gorman, possibly a bishop of the period, and dated April 21, 1907.

This past Sunday, Sept. 14, the church had another surprise visit – this one from members of the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey Police Department – who were returning two liturgical identified as being from Holy Cross which they said were found near railroad tracks in Jersey City along with a canopy known as the “banner of Our Lady of Guadalupe,” which the church displays during the annual Feast Day on Dec. 12.

Girone said the intruder is believed to have removed the missals or books of prayer from a shelf in one of the rooms of the rectory. He said these were “old translations” of prayers that have since been replaced by the church.

“When the Port Authority police brought them to us, they were waterlogged,” he added.

Girone said the intruder apparently entered the rectory by climbing through a window on the side of the building.

Police described the suspect as African-American, between 50 and 60, about 5-feet-10, with short black and gray hair, a black and gray beard, wearing a black shirt and denim shorts.

In other recent criminal activities logged by Harrison PD, police listed these incidents:

Sept. 9 

Two bicycle thefts were reported.

In the first incident, reported at 2 p.m., the owner of a green Huffy valued at $30 told police he parked his bike in front of 506 Frank E. Rodgers Blvd. N. at 12:20 p.m. and when he returned at 1 p.m., the bike was gone.

The second theft, reported at 7:46 p.m., involved the disappearance of a gray Mongoose with orange tire rims, valued at $350, which, according to its owner, had been secured at the bike rack near the Harrison PATH station at 8:30 a.m., but which, upon the owner’s return at 7 p.m., was missing.

Sept. 10 

Hilario Gonzalez, no age or address listed, was pulled over in front of 36 Harrison Ave., at 2 p.m., after police said they observed his vehicle cross the painted median as it approached the intersection of Harrison Ave. and First St. In questioning the driver, police said they detected a strong odor of alcohol on his breath. Gonzalez was ticketed for DWI, reckless driving, being an unlicensed driver and maintenance of lamps.

Ruling due on high school vote

By Ron Leir 

Observer Correspondent 

EAST NEWARK – 

East Newark wants to ask its residents, through a non-binding referendum, this question: “Should East Newark high school students be sent to Kearny High School instead of Harrison High School?”

The borough wants the question to go on the ballot for the Nov. 4 general election and the Hudson County Clerk’s Office has prepared such a ballot. Sample ballots were to be mailed out this past Monday.

But the Harrison Board of Education – which stands to lose a lot of money if the switch is done – has gone to court to block its neighbor from conducting the referendum, which – by itself – has no legal standing to change anything.

Hudson County Superior Court Assignment Judge Peter Bariso reserved decision at a hearing held in Jersey City last Friday. He will likely rule on Harrison’s request on Wednesday, Sept. 24, at 3 p.m.

The East Newark Board of Education, meanwhile, has hired its own lawyer to draft a feasibility study to make its case with the state Commissioner of Education to end a more than 100-year-old practice of sending its school children to Harrison High. East Newark has a single school which educates students in pre-K through grade 8.

But East Newark Mayor Joseph Smith, whose wife Marlene is president of the local school board, has previously said that the tuition fees assessed by the Harrison school board are too high for borough taxpayers so the borough is looking for an alternative – which, in this case, happens to be Kearny High.

Currently, East Newark is sending 125 students to Harrison High at a cost of $16,300 a year per student, according to Harrison school board records.

For the past several months, representatives of the East Newark and Harrison school boards have been talking about a possible compromise, with interim Executive Hudson County Superintendent of Schools Monica Tone serving as a sort of referee. At the same time, the East Newark school board is, through its legal advisor, pursuing the path toward separation that could take effect as early as the 2015- 2016 school year.

On May 14, the East Newark Borough Council resolved “to obtain the sentiment of the voters … on whether the send-receive relationship with Harrison High School should be ended and East Newark high school students [be] sent to Kearny High School.” And, on May 29, the borough asked Hudson County Clerk Barbara Netchert to put the question on the November ballot.

Princeton attorney Richard E. Shapiro, retained as special counsel by the Harrison Board of Education, filed legal papers last week with Hudson County Superior Court, asking the court to order the county clerk to “refrain from placing the proposed question … on the ballot,” or, failing that, to “remove the proposed question from the ballot….”

In the brief filed with the court, Shapiro argued that the borough exceeded its statutory authority in calling for such a referendum because state law limits municipalities to seek such action only to “… any question or policy pertaining to the government or internal affairs” of the municipality.

Viewed in this context, Shapiro reasoned, the proposed question “relates to an educational issue within the purview of the Borough of East Newark’s Board of Education,” and, therefore, fails to meet the criteria set by the statute.

As such, Shapiro says, the proposed question “… is illegal and cannot lawfully be placed on the ballot for the next general election on Nov. 4, 2014.”

In his legal papers, Shapiro cites a 1958 case known as Botkin v. Westwood in which the state Appellate Court held that Westwood’s municipal governing body’s proposal for a non-binding referendum on whether there should be a “deconsolidation” of the consolidated school district of Westwood and Washington Township was improper.

The court found that “this particular referendum question does constitute a prohibited intrusion … in school district affairs by a body which has no business intermeddling with them in the slightest degree except as the legislature has permitted.”

East Newark school board’s feasibility study is still in process but the Kearny Board of Education went on record in March to accept the borough’s students at Kearny High if and when that possibility unfolds.

Loving life in Harrison

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By Ron Leir 

Observer Correspondent 

HARRISON –

When a young Theodore Plasky moved with his mother to the Kingsland Court apartments in Harrison in 1959, they found it a welcome refuge.

“We were staying at my cousin’s house in Fairview and the house blew up – I think it was something to do with the heating system that caused an explosion,” Plasky recalled. A little boy who lived next door was killed by the force of the blast, he said.

“We needed a place to stay and my mother took us here,” Plasky said. Since then, he added, “Everything’s been great.” Plasky, who says everyone in the complex knows him as “Ted,” made a living by playing accordion with different musical groups in the area.

Plasky was one of five longstanding public housing tenants awarded framed certificates of appreciation by the Harrison Housing Authority last Wednesday, Sept. 17, as the authority celebrated its 75th anniversary barbecue at Harrison Gardens, the town’s first public housing development.

It was among the earliest government-built housing complexes in the nation, on the heels of Congress’s passage of the U.S. Housing Law (also known as the Wagner-Steagall Act) in 1937 which provided federal funds for the creation of affordable housing.

A company called JAJ Construction Inc. built Harrison Gardens, 214 apartments spread among 10 buildings, at a cost of $1,070,000, which comes out to about $5,000 per unit, according to Harrison Housing Authority Executive Director Roy Rogers. Hugh A. Kelly was the design engineer on the project and the thentown engineer Joseph Cundari signed off on the plans.

When “the Gardens,” as the complex is commonly called, opened, the average monthly rent was $22; today, monthly rentals at the Gardens range from $650 to $700, Rogers said.

Kingsland Court, with 54 apartments, dates from 1952.

What makes the Gardens distinctive among the hundreds of public housing clusters built around the country, Rogers said, is that, “These are the original units – the walls were never modified – they were well-constructed brick with the original plaster. All the buildings have the same basic footprint.” The interiors – kitchens, bathrooms and HVAC systems – have been upgraded over the years, he said.

HHA maintenance worker Michael Ferriero, who has helped with the upkeep of those apartments, was presented with a certificate of appreciation at the celebration “as being the current longest working employee at the Harrison Housing Authority” with 33 years under his belt.

Other tenants who received certificates of appreciation were: Charles Kinsella, who has lived at the Gardens for 63 years; Margaret Kearns (mother of Harrison Police Chief Derek Kearns), a Gardens resident for over six decades; Jean McCormack and Geralding Doffont, both Gardens residents for over half a century.

As the many guests at the barbecue helped themselves to free hotdogs, hamburgers and soda, and as kids enjoyed pony rides, a petting zoo and a lemon toss, various local officials talked about old times at the Gardens.

HHA Commissioner/Councilman Larry Bennett recalled how as a boy, “I lived [nearby] on Franklin Ave. and, during the winter, I liked coming to Harrison Gardens because it was warm inside.”

Bennett said it was important to remember that, “Cops, lawyers, all good people, came out of here.”

Mayor James Fife, a former longtime Harrison educator, told the crowd that he felt an attachment to the Gardens because “I grew up in a housing project in Newark – in Hyatt Court – from the ages of 2 to 15 and it was a great place to grow up.” Unfortunately, he added, “many of those buildings have been knocked down since then.”

And Councilman James Doran, currently personnel director for the Harrison Board of Education, said he spent part of his youth in the Gardens’ Building 1, as did Councilman Victor Villalta, “and [Board of Education member] Artie Pettigrew lived in Building 7.”

“So many familiar names are connected to the Gardens,” Doran said. “It feels good to be home.”

190M could flow to the Passaic

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The Occidental Chemical Corp. has agreed to pay the State of New Jersey $190 million to resolve the company’s liability in the contamination of the Passaic River, state officials announced last week.

Occidental is the legal successor to Diamond Shamrock Chemicals Co., which had manufactured pesticides and herbicides at its plant on Lister Ave. in the Ironbound section in Newark — and reportedly dumped the toxic waste into the water. The factory was near the riverbank, directly across from Harrison and South Kearny.

From the 1940s through the 1960s, the state says, Diamond Shamrock (formerly Diamond Alkali) intentionally discharged hazardous substances — including the infamous defoliant Agent Orange, a known carcinogen used during the Vietnam War — into the Passaic.

In the river-pollution litigation launched by the state, Occidental was the lone defendant that had yet to settle. However, the agreement is still a proposed settlement, subject to a public comment period and review by a Superior Court judge. Officials said a decision could come by December.

“The cleanup of the lower Passaic River is vital to the health and safety of people who live and work along the river and is one of the state’s top environmental priorities,” said Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin.

Those people are you, The Observer readers. The lower Passaic is that stretch bordering Lyndhurst, North Arlington, Nutley, Belleville, Kearny, East Newark and Harrison. It is considered by some environmentalists to be the most polluted waterway in the nation.

Calling the Passaic “one of our most precious natural resources,” Acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman stated, “Our objective throughout the Passaic River litigation has been to hold accountable those legally responsible for contaminating the river, and we have done so.”

If approved, the Occidental settlement would bring to $355.4 million the total amount recovered by N.J. as a result of litigation involving the river cleanup and contamination-removal costs, natural resource damages and other expenses, the state says.

Environmentalists point out, though, that due to a change in the law, a portion of the funds could be directed, not toward river remediation, but into the state’s general fund.

Last April, the federal Environmental Protection Agency announced a plan to remove toxic sediment from the lower eight miles of the Passaic flowing into Newark Bay. The cost of that project is estimated at $1.7 billion.

– Karen Zautyk 

Kearny vs. Harrison at Red Bull

HARRISON – 

After a two-year lull, the Red Bull Arena will once again host a soccer doubleheader, matching up longtime archrivals Harrison and Kearny, on Saturday, Sept. 27.

The Blue Tide will be hoping to avenge the Kardinals’ sweep of the boys’ and girls’ games played in 2011 at the Arena.

The Kardinals girls’ squad of Kearny High School will face off against the Blue Tide girls’ team of Harrison High School on the Arena pitch, starting at noon.

That game will be followed, at 2 p.m., with the Kardinals boys’ group taking on the Blue Tide boys’ crew.

James Doran, Harrison school district’s director of personnel, and Kearny High Athletic Director John Millar each said that the Red Bull organization has confirmed it has agreed to play host to the event this year.

“We’d certainly like to make this an annual thing [at the Harrison-based Arena],” Doran said.

Doran said the Red Bull organization will be taping the games but no decision has yet been made as to whether it will go out on a live feed to local cable. Each school district will be provided a copy of the tape “which we will post on our website,” he added.

The games will count as part of each team’s regular season schedule, he added.

Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for students.

In Harrison, tickets may be secured through the superintendent’s office or at the high school and, in Kearny, tickets are available at the high school athletic office. Or, patrons can buy tickets on game day at the Arena on Frank E. Rodgers Blvd. across from the Harrison PATH station.

Two years ago, the Red Bulls provided nominal cash donations to both schools but for this year’s event, no contribution is anticipated, according to Millar. “It’s a big expense just to open the stadium,” he noted.

 – Ron Leir 

Taking shape

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Kearny Public Library Director Josh Humphrey stands in the nearly-completed outdoor reading garden, with plantings, bluestone pavers, benches, a small stage for public events, 4-foot-high fencing and a ramped entrance allowing wheelchair access, adjacent to the main branch of the library, 318 Kearny Ave. Work still to be done includes replacement of the library’s old wrought-iron fencing. Part of the project included construction of a retaining wall as a buffer to neighboring residences. Humphrey projects a formal opening of the garden by next month. Lou’s Landscaping of Wayne was contracted to do the job for $245,000. The town is applying a $150,000 grant from the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund toward the cost of the project

Coccia agent is a 6-time winner

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KEARNY —

For the sixth time in eight months this year, Billy Pena has been named Realtor of the Month at Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Coccia Realty’s Kearny office, Jan R. Kwapniewski, president and owner of BHGRE Coccia Realty announced this week.

In August, Pena closed eight transactions, and to date in 2014, he’s closed 22 deals with a volume of $6.6 million, according to NJMLS statistics. He has seven pending transactions coming in September, as well.

The only agent who has closed more deals is Pena’s business partner, Amelia Pena, also a realtor with BHGRE | Coccia Realty. Year-to-date she has closed 25 transactions with a sales volume of $7.75 million.

Pena’s territory includes Harrison, Kearny, North Arlington and Lyndhurst. He specializes in residential, multifamily and income producing properties.

“Billy has been with us for over three years now, and he’s consistently been one of our top performers in the West Hudson County and South Bergen County areas,” Kwapniewski said. “I am very happy Billy decided to get into real estate after spending years as a financial advisor. He’s been a tremendous asset to our company.”

When asked about the qualities that contributed to Pena’s success, Kwapniewski credits Pena’s diligence, tenacity, market knowledge and customer service. “He also assimilated, quite well, the systems, technologies and tools provided to us by BHGRE and learned how to incorporate them into his business plan, providing his clients with exemplary service.”

Pena obtained his New Jersey real estate salesperson’s license in 2003. After spending a decade as a financial services advisor he transitioned into real estate sales over three years ago. He says he really enjoys the flexibility being a real-estate agent offers him, something that wasn’t possible in the corporate world.

“In the corporate America, there’s very little wiggle room in terms of working hours and production,” Pena said. “Here, I know I have freedom and flexibility. And I know there’s not that rigid structure to deal with. It’s a great life. I get to meet terrific people and help them realize their amazing goals and dreams. It’s a wonderful feeling when you help a person achieve something so personal and significant.”

That same flexibility allows him to be involved in numerous activities outside of real estate.

He currently serves on the Kearny Urban Enterprise Zone’s board of commissioners (KUEZ), is a member of the Pre-Cana team at St. Stephen’s Church, Kearny (marriage-preparation team), a member of the St. Stephen’s baptism-prep team and is a member of the Kearny Portuguese Cultural Association. He is a member of the National Association of Realtors and the New Jersey Association of Realtors.

The 35-year-old Kearny High School (1998) and Montclair State University graduate is married to Susana Pena, an elementary school teacher. They have a 4-year-old son, Lucas. To contact Pena, call him on his mobile at 201-232-4339 or send an email to billy@mycoccia.com.

BHGRE Coccia Realty, privately owned by Jan R. Kwapniewski, serves Hudson, Bergen, Morris, Essex, Passaic and Union counties. It was established in 1961 by Joseph Coccia Jr. In 1989, the company transitioned to new ownership and has since been led by Kwapniewski, who has modernized and grown the company while adhering to the original values of high standards, service and trust that were instilled in him by the original owner.

Coccia employs more than 100 agents, many of whom are multi-lingual speaking Spanish, English, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Greek, Hindi, Macedonian, Chinese, Russian, Slovak, Ukrainian and Polish. Its associates are seasoned agents with many years of service and have won numerous sales awards and accolades from various organizations. Offices are open seven days a week.

BHGRE Coccia’s year-todate includes closing over 190 transactions in 2014, totaling over $62 million in volume, according to statistics released by the New Jersey Multiple Listing Service (NJMLS).

For more information, call 201-997-7000, or visit www.cocciarealty.com or facebook.com/cocciarealty.