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Relief for commuters

By Ron Leir  Observer Correspondent  LYNDHURST –  After what Lyndhurst Mayor Robert Giangeruso characterized as “33 years of starts and stops,” the township – with help from Bergen County – is finally beginning to see the start of improvements to the intersection at Kingsland and Riverside Aves. The changes […]

Convicted in mortgage swindle

A Belleville man was among three defendants convicted earlier this month in federal court for their roles in a $15 million mortgage fraud scheme involving condominiums in New Jersey and Florida, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman reported. Last month, another Belleville resident pleaded guilty in the same scam. According to […]

Walmart is keeping cops busy

By Karen Zautyk  Observer Correspondent  KEARNY –  The Walmart in Kearny is conveniently located on Harrison Ave., with easy access to Rt. 280, the N.J. Turnpike and feeder roads to Newark and Jersey City. This is a boon for shoppers. However, according to Kearny police, it is […]

2011 layoffs affirmed

By Ron Leir  Observer Correspondent  KEARNY – Four former Kearny workers, including a union chief, have lost the first round of a bid to reverse their New Year’s Eve dismissals nearly three years ago. In a 21-page ruling issued Sept. 3, the state Office of Administrative Law […]

Go pink at St. Michael’s

Don your favorite pink attire and join St. Michael’s Medical Center for a Breast Cancer Awareness Month event — Breast Health & You — on Saturday, Oct. 25, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at SMMC’s Connie Dwyer Breast Center, 111 Central Ave., Newark. Dr. Nadine Pappas, director of […]

 
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Kardinals have chance to be good soccer squad

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By Jim Hague 

Observer Sports Writer 

The Kearny High School boys’ soccer team enjoyed a highly successful season in 2013, winning 15 games and advancing to the Hudson County Tournament semifinals and the NJSIAA North Jersey Section 1, Group IV quarterfinals, defeating Roxbury and Clifton before losing to Bergen Tech.

But that wasn’t good enough for a typical Kearny boys’ soccer season.

“Especially since we came up empty and didn’t win anything,” said veteran head coach Bill Galka. “We have a bunch of kids back who remember what that felt like. They don’t want to have another year like that.”

Galka said that he is counting on a veteran team to lead the way in 2014.

“You’re always looking for the returning players to be leaders,” Galka said. “They want to avenge what happened last year and go after championships and challenge for them.”

The Kardinals began practice in earnest last week to prepare for the season opener Sept. 5.

“Every year, we have returning players and that’s good,” Galka said. “But you have to remind yourself that you haven’t played a game in nine months. So we’re still forming training habits and getting chemistry. That’s what you do in the preseason. You can teach good ideas of the game, but we have to find the right positions for the players again and who is going to be taking those spots.”

Galka has had to endure yet another obstacle before the Kardinals have even begun training. Three of his projected players have decided to sign on to local soccer academies, forgoing their year with the Kardinals. One of those players made the decision only minutes before the team’s first workout. That’s not easy to overcome.

“We face that every year,” Galka said. “They were some good players.”

One of the key players returning is one of the top soccer players in the state in senior goalkeeper Sebastian Ferreira.

Ferreira was injured at the end of last season and it was evident how much it hurt the Kards not having him in goal.

“We’re lucky enough to have a top keeper,” Galka said.

 

Photo by Jim Hague Senior Alexi Velaszquez is Kearny’s top returning scorer. Velazquez scored 10 goals last season before getting injured.

Photo by Jim Hague
Senior Alexi Velaszquez is Kearny’s top returning scorer. Velazquez scored 10
goals last season before getting injured.

“And he’s this team’s leader. He’s the guy. He’s the one leading everyone in fitness drills. He’s the first one on the field. He’s a natural leader. I don’t think we’ve had a great leader like this since (former Observer Male Athlete of the Year) Hughie MacDonald (in 2002). That’s how important Seba is.”

The Kardinals do have some veterans returning along the back line to help Ferreira protect the net.

Senior Andrew Quintos returns to his position at center back and is joined along the back line by senior Michael Almeida and junior Cort Montanino. Sophomore Adrian Velazquez, who saw considerable action last year as a freshman, also returns.

Junior Damien Kolodiej is another solid defender who will see considerable action, along with seniors Daniel Villalta and Christopher Smith.

“We have some good returning kids back there,” Galka said. “Our defense should be the strength of the team.”

Junior Marcelo Matta is one of the top returning players in the midfield. Matta had a handful of goals last year and should see that number increase due to the graduation of other top scorers.

“He’s a good distributor,” Galka said. “I’m looking for him to be more of a leader, both on and off the field.”

Senior Danny Vicente returns to the Kardinal lineup. Vicente was a solid player as a freshman and sophomore, then went off to play with a soccer academy last year, only to return now for his senior campaign.

Junior Christian Sieira is another midfielder to watch, along with Calvin Carbajol, as well as the aforementioned Smith.

Senior Alexi Velazquez is a force to be reckoned with at forward. Velazquez scored 10 goals last year before becoming injured toward the end of last season.

“We’re looking for him to have a great senior year,” Galka said.

Senior Arturo Sanchez is another Kardinal forward with a strong leg and a knack for the net.

So it shapes up to be a solid season for the Kardinals in the weeks prior to the season opener.

“We definitely think we have promise,” Galka said. “At least, from what I see so far. We’re good to go and we’re looking forward to our scrimmages and then the start of the season.”

There’s another reason to be excited. It looks as if the Kardinals will get the chance to face neighboring rival Harrison at Red Bull Arena the last weekend in September. The finishing touches are being made to a soccer doubleheader (boys and girls) at the local soccer palace, featuring the neighboring rivals.

The two schools met in a doubleheader in 2012 and it was a day to remember.

“It’s just about definite,” Galka said. “We’re excited about that.”

As well as excited about starting a new season. It should be a great one for the Kardinals, one that definitely has championship aspirations – like it always should have.

So much for summer, it’s time for fall sports

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By Jim Hague

Observer Sports Writer

Well, you think there’s still time to get out the suntan lotion, hit the beach and ride the waves, right?

Sorry to say, but if you’re a high school athlete, those days are done. Summer is officially over. It’s time to lace up the cleats, put on the helmets and pads, kick the balls and get running. The fall sports season is upon us.

Practices for the fall sports teams officially began last week. Everywhere you go in the area, you’ll find kids carrying their football equipment to their respective fields of play or others kicking soccer balls at goals.

It’s time to get ready for the fall scholastic sports season, which will begin the weekend of Sept. 5. That’s just two weeks from now. It’s astounding how the summer has flown by.

Soon, the work will be completed at Rip Collins Field in North Arlington and the athletes at North Arlington High will have a brand new place to play, complete with new locker rooms and a state-of-the-art FieldTurf playing surface. In the spring, there will be track meets there. No longer will North Arlington mothers have to worry about getting goose poop stains out of the respective uniforms.

The Vikings’ soccer team will certainly miss Observer Male Athlete of the Year Danny Cordeiro, but coach Jesse Dembowski will always find a way to win. The NA girls’ program has a new coach in Dan Farinola, who was successful as the boys’ coach at Secaucus. Farinola will do a good job as the Viking girls’ head coach.

The Vikings’ football coach is veteran Anthony Marck and we know he’s excited about the new field, maybe more than his team’s prospects.

There are new soccer coaches at Queen of Peace, both on the boys’ and girls’ sides. There’s also a new athletic director in former All-State tight end Joe Torchia, who almost made the Washington Redskins’ roster a few years ago. We would like to know who the new soccer coaches are, but Torchia has not returned several phone calls. Maybe Torchia doesn’t regularly check his school voicemail, but we’re still waiting to hear from the coaches. So if either of you ––namely the boys’ or girls’ soccer coach at QP – read this column, please take the time to write me via e-mail (at the address listed above) and tell me what’s the best time to reach you by phone.

The football team at QP is in capable hands with veteran Bob Kearns, but the Golden Griffins are certainly going to miss the 2,000 yards and 30- plus touchdowns that standout Kevin Momnohin brought to the table last fall. That’s not easy to replace.

The Harrison boys’ soccer team is returning several players from last year’s team that won the championship in the NJSIAA North Jersey Section 2, Group II bracket.

It should be interesting to see how the Blue Tide and veteran coach Mike Rusek will move on after losing such talented players like All-State defender and do-everything Modou Sowe, clearly one of the best soccer players to ever grace Harrison High _ and there certainly have been plenty of dandies over the years.

The boys’ soccer program at Harrison never rebuilds. It’s always a case of reloading. That should be the case again this season.

The Harrison girls’ program is now headed by former boys’ standout goalie Raphael Viana. There was never a nicer kid to ever come through the halls of Harrison High than Raphael when he was a player. Let’s see how that personality transcends into being a high school coach at his alma mater, working with the girls.

The Blue Tide football program will begin the second season under coach Matt Gallo, who made strides a year ago making the Blue Tide much more respected and competitive. That’s all a coach could ask for in his first year at the helm. Now that he’s in his second year, it’s safe to say that Gallo wants to raise the bar just a little bit.

Lyndhurst has a new football coach in Rich Tuero, who is another guy taking over a program at his alma mater. Tuero was a standout lineman during his playing days, so he’s going to demand solid play up front from the Golden Bears.

The boys’ soccer program is in the capable hands of Rob Kost, who has worked diligently in trying to make the Golden Bears more competitive each year.

The Lyndhurst girls’ soccer team is perennially one of the best around and this year should be no exception for head coach Kim Hykey. The Golden Bears might have lost a lot of firepower with the graduations of Amanda Nowak and Grace Tomko, but center midfielder Giana DiTonto, who had 20-plus assists last fall, should be able to carry the slack and emerge as one of the players to watch in the NJIC.

Speaking of girls’ soccer, there should be no local team better than the Maroon Raiders of Nutley.

Coach Mike DiPiano has worked wonders, turning a destitute program that could barely win a single game into a state-ranked power. The Maroon Raiders went 18-2- 1 and won their division of the Super Essex Conference last year and should do more damage again this year, thanks to the efforts of 30-goal scorers like Victoria Kealy and Zoe Steck.

Kealy had an astounding 31 goals and 14 assists last season. Most soccer players don’t reach that number in a career.

The Maroon Raiders’ boys program is under the careful guidance of veteran head coach Marcelino Marra, who is one of the best tactical coaches around.

The Nutley football program begins its second season under coach Tom Basile, who has paid his dues in the coaching ranks for almost three decades and will look to lead the Maroon Raiders back to state playoff contender.

Jim Damiano has taken over the soccer program at his alma mater Belleville.

Joe Fischer has returned as the head football coach at Belleville and should lead the Buccaneers back to respectability.

All in all, it shapes up to be an interesting scholastic sports year. Sorry to say, but the summer is gone. Put away the beach chair until next Memorial Day. The summer sure flew by, didn’t it?

NA’s McCarthy remains king of New Jersey football scouting

McCarthy_web

By Jim Hague 

Observer Sports Writer 

He’s now 72. His health in recent years hasn’t been great, battling kidney cancer, diabetes and heart problems.

“I shouldn’t be here,” says Dennis McCarthy, a longtime North Arlington resident.

But McCarthy is still here, feeling better than he has in a long time.

“I feel like I’m hitting my stride,” McCarthy said. “I feel like I can keep going for another 20 years.”

McCarthy has been going full speed for the last 25 years and with the help of his son Dave, has been putting out The McCarthy Report, the top high school football scouting report in the country.

Disregard all these fly-by-night newcomers who claim that they have seen practically every high school football player in the world.

The McCarthys, Dennis and Dave, watch all of the players in New Jersey with a fine tooth comb and offer their evaluations for approximately 75 colleges, ranging from NCAA Division I institutions through the junior college and NAIA ranks.

At one time, the McCarthy Report was offered to the general public.

“That was for one year,” Dennis McCarthy said. “It was a mistake.”

Now, the McCarthy Report goes out only to the colleges and helps the New Jersey high school football player gain millions of dollars in scholarships.

“Every year, we have to keep up,” McCarthy said. “I call all of the schools.”

The entire operation for the McCarthy Report is run from the McCarthy’s tiny home in North Arlington. The living room looks like a library of VHS tapes, which are now outdated thanks to the advances in technology.

There was a time when Dennis McCarthy would run all over the Garden State –video camera in tow– to capture some of the top players on tape to enhance his report.

That’s not the case any longer.

“Because of the Internet, we do no filming at all,” McCarthy said. “Now, I just go to the computer. It saved my life. I couldn’t do it anymore.”

McCarthy said that he first started scouting prospective college players in 1956, when he was a 14-year-old high school student in West New York, helping his uncle, Angelo Amato, help local youngsters to get to the University of Notre Dame, where McCarthy ended up attending.

“I would go to games with my uncle and give him advice on players,” McCarthy said.

Two of those players, Frank Garguilo (currently the superintendent of schools for the Hudson County Schools of Technology) and Tom Liggio (a former Hudson County Freeholder), went on to play at Notre Dame.

Thus, the birth of a career.

“I knew in my mind, I always wanted to do something with football in New Jersey,” McCarthy said. “I remember going to the old Polo Grounds with my father to see the Giants play and he asked if I wanted to meet the players. I got all their autographs. That was when I got hooked.”

McCarthy went to Notre Dame in 1961 and tried to make the Irish roster as a walk-on.

“That’s when I realized everyone was stronger, bigger and faster than me,” McCarthy said. “But the interest was always there.”

The Notre Dame football coaching staff allowed McCarthy to remain as a tour guide for prospective players and go-fer.

“That’s when I was hooked for life,” McCarthy said.

He came home and tried working in the newspaper business as a public relations representative for the old Paterson Evening News. He was in the public relations business for municipalities like Paterson, worked in the Chamber of Commerce offices in Paterson and Newark. He was also a bartender for a long stint in Lyndhurst.

It was behind the stick that fueled McCarthy’s interest in getting back into scouting football full-time.

“I had a lot of college coaches come into the bar,” McCarthy said. “We had NFL guys stay there (the old Holiday Inn in Lyndhurst) as well. I became friendly with the coaches and would recommend players to them. I still went to all the high school games.”

Some of those games involved his son Dave, who was a fine football player at Lyndhurst High School and later Northeastern.

“Once my kids (McCarthy has another son, Ryan) got older, I needed something to do,” McCarthy said. The McCarthy Report, in its purest form, was born.

“This is what I was supposed to do,” McCarthy said. “Boy, oh boy, did it fit like a glove.”

McCarthy hit the ground running 25 years ago.

“In 1990, I sent it to the colleges for free,” McCarthy said. “I ran all over the state, taking notes, watching practices, games. I would go to Cape May, Camden, Atlantic City, all over. I spent a lot of time on the phone, talking with high school coaches and college coaches. I put out reports on more than 200 kids.”

A lot of time is now spent interviewing the players who end up in the report. If a prospective player says the wrong thing during the phone interview, it might be costly in terms of making the McCarthy Report.

“The interview is a big part of the process,” McCarthy said. “A lot of the kids have no idea that it’s why they were put on this earth, to be a football player and get a scholarship. They think it comes easy.”

Over the years, McCarthy has aided with colleges finding out about some of the most obscure players in New Jersey high school football. Several years ago, the McCarthy Report was the first to mention the talents of a defensive tackle from Westwood High School. His name was B.J. Raji, who then went on to play at Boston College and was a hero for the Green Bay Packers in their Super Bowl championship at the end of the 2010 season.

McCarthy was the first to find Leon Johnson out of Bound Brook, who is now a redshirt freshman at Temple University. McCarthy is convinced that the offensive tackle Johnson will eventually become a first round draft pick in the NFL.

Needless to say, it’s a tedious task rounding up the best high school football players in New Jersey.

“It’s definitely a labor of love,” McCarthy said. “Make no bones about it, it’s now David’s business. I don’t get paid.”

While there are unfortunately no local products from The Observer circulation area that were fortunate enough to be included in the 2014 version of the McCarthy Report, the founding father of the scouting service thinks it should be a good year for the gridiron in the Garden State.

“I fully expect this to be a banner year,” McCarthy said. “As of right now, we have already 48 NCAA Division I commitments. The most we’ve ever had in New Jersey was 80 two years ago. I think this could go past that. It’s a phenomenal class.”

And McCarthy is already hard at work compiling the players who will grace the McCarthy Report in 2015. There is no sign of the genius slowing down.

“The time and effort that you have to put into it is a lot,” McCarthy said. “But I find now, with the way it is, I put even more time into it. I get up early in the morning, go to the computer and look at more kids.”

With his health fine, there’s no need for Dennis McCarthy to stop being the guru of New Jersey high school football, right from the comforts of his North Arlington living room.

Senior housing project advancing

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HARRISON – 

The 15-unit, 3-story apartment building billed as affordable rental housing for senior citizens – the first such development for Harrison – is taking shape on Harrison Ave., just east of the Harrison Gardens public housing complex.

Last week, after several workers secured the boxed modular apartments with ropes, a crane lifted sections of the modulars from the bed of a tractor-trailer truck into place at the construction site.

As a precaution, Harrison police officers halted east and westbound traffic on a section of Harrison Ave. as the crane operator performed his job. The Domus Corp., the construction arm of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Newark, has been contracted for the project. Del-Sano Contracting Corp. of Union, which has previously built seven affordable senior buildings for Domus, is handling this project.

Last fall, Domus CEO John Westervelt had projected that the building would be completed by fall 2014 and would be ready for occupancy by December 2014 or early 2015 and it now appears that schedule will be met.

Westervelt said that the apartments – all 650 square feet one-bedrooms – will be “marketed and advertised in local and regional newspapers, as well as local senior centers and service providers.”

Federal regulations mandate that, “units must also be posted on the state’s Housing Resource Center website” and that “a lottery will be used” to help pick the tenants, who must be 62 and older and meet income requirements to qualify for consideration, he said.

Apartment rental applications haven’t yet been processed.

Because federal and state funding is involved, the apartments cannot be restricted only to Harrison residents.

The $3.7 million project has generated some controversy because $1.8 million of the total is drawn from the state’s Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery funding pot, designed as relief from the ravages of Superstorm Sandy in 2012. While Sandy did have some impact on Harrison, the proportion of any displaced residents pales in comparison to areas like the Jersey Shore.

Domus, which is also using $1.4 million in county HOME funds and $509,000 in Affordable Housing Trust funds from Harrison for the project, pursued the Disaster Recover money when it became available in 2013 after having failed previously to secure a Federal Home Loan Bank grant and tax credits, according to Westervelt.

As to the projected rentals, Domus says that 12 of the apartments will likely go for $705 per month while three will probably be priced at $560 per month, keyed to income guidelines.

Westervelt said Domus “is pursuing [additional affordable senior projects] in Bergen and Union counties but no additional projects in the West Hudson area at the moment.” However, Harrison Mayor James Fife said the town is exploring the possibility of acquiring several privately-owned parcels – which he declined to identify – with an eye to securing more public housing sites.

– Ron Leir 

Sobering reminder for all drivers

Police departments in four Observer communities are among 195 New Jersey law enforcement agencies that have been awarded grants to fund their participation in the state’s “Drive Sober, or Get Pulled Over” end-of-summer crackdown on drunk and impaired drivers.

Each of the agencies — including the Kearny, Lyndhurst, Belleville and Bloomfield police — is receiving $5,000, to be earmarked for checkpoints and saturation patrols, the Division of Highway Traffic Safety announced last week.

The total awarded throughout the state was $975,000.

This year’s crackdown began Friday and will run to Sept. 1. More than 300 additional police departments are expected to participate in the initiative unfunded.

According to highway authorities, nationwide a fatal alcohol-impaired-driving crash occurs every 51 minutes on average throughout the year. Over the Labor Day weekend, that statistic reportedly jumps to one fatality every 34 minutes, with 46% occurring between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m.

During last year’s crackdown, law enforcement made 1,365 DWI arrests statewide. They also issued citations for speeding (5,710), seatbelt violations (4,153), driving with a suspended license (3,563) and reckless driving (936).

Nearly 1,800 fugitives also were apprehended during the campaign, authorities reported.

The Division of Highway Traffic Safety offers the following advice for those who choose to drink:

* Take mass transit, a taxi or ask a sober friend to drive you home.

* Spend the night rather than get behind the wheel.

* Report impaired drivers to law enforcement. In New Jersey, drivers may dial #77 to report a drunk or aggressive driver.

* Always buckle up, every ride, regardless of your seating position in the vehicle. It’s your best defense against an impaired driver.

* If you’re intoxicated, do not travel on foot. Take a cab or have a sober friend or family member drive or escort you to your doorstep.

Gary Poedubicky, acting director of the Division of Highway Traffic Safety,: “Many people believe that even after having a few drinks, they can still drive. One’s judgment is among the first things to be affected after consuming alcohol . . . even one drink can impair judgment and reaction time, creating a potentially dangerous situation for everyone on the road.”

Notes from the KPD blotter

A Schuyler Ave. couple got a rude awakening early Saturday, Aug. 9, when a driver crashed his station wagon into the side of their apartment unit, showering them with sheetrock as they slept, Kearny police reported. The motorist, who himself had apparently slept through the crash, was charged with driving while intoxicated.

Police said a report of a vehicle striking a building on the 700 block of Schuyler came in at 5:15 a.m., and responding Officer Mike Santucci arrived to find a 2002 Ford wagon against the side of an apartment, the driver sound asleep behind the wheel of the still-running vehicle.

After repeated attempts, Santucci managed to rouse him and when the man rolled down the window, a strong odor of alcohol reportedly wafted from the wagon. The officer had to unlock the door for the driver, who exited staggering, police said.

The impact of the crash had cracked both the outside and inside walls of the apartment, sending shards of sheetrock down on the sleeping tenants. Police said neither the couple nor the motorist, Wilfred Montas, 22, of Elizabeth, was injured.

Montas was given an Alcotest and issued summonses for DWI and careless driving. Other recent reports from the KPD blotter included the following:

Aug. 6 

Police were contacted by the owner of a restaurant who said that someone had been defecating outside the premises on the 100 block of Kearny Ave. This had occurred at least twice, reportedly resulting in more than $500 in clean-up costs. Det. Scott Traynor viewed security videos from the area and developed as a suspect Arthur Smith, 50, of Kearny. A warrant has been issued for his arrest on a charge of criminal mischief.

Aug. 11 

At 9:30 a.m., Det. Michael Andrews was on off-duty traffic detail on the Pulaski Skyway when he came upon a 2012 Mercedes that appeared to be having mechanical trouble. Since the car had to be towed, Andrews asked the driver for the paperwork and was handed a license issued to a man whose photo did not resemble the driver, police said. Challenged by Andrews, the driver reportedly admitted that the license belonged to a friend and that his own was suspended. Police said he was also found to have an outstanding Newark warrant. Ekendilichukwu Atanmo, 27, of Newark, was charged with the MV violation, the warrant and with hindering apprehension.

Officer Glenn Reed, on patrol at 11:15 p.m.. found a Freightliner tractor-trailer stopped in traffic and blocking the right eastbound lane on Harrison Ave.

When the driver, Juan Aguirremallea, 54, of Kearny, was advised that the truck had to be moved, he reportedly refused to do so, launched into a “profane tirade” and also refused to produce his credentials. Aguirremallea was charged criminally with obstructing the administration of law and was issued summonses for failure to comply with an officer’s directions and obstructing traffic. The Freightliner was towed from the scene.

 Aug. 12 

The NYPD warrant task force contacted the KPD for assistance in locating and arresting a former Kearny resident, 49-year-old Michael Murdy, who was wanted on an N.Y.C. no-bail theft warrant. Shortly after 8 a.m., Det. Scott Traynor found and detained Murdy at Morgan Place and the Belleville Turnpike. He was taken into custody by the detective and New York officers, brought to KPD headquarters and turned over to the NYPD. Police said Murdy was also found to have a warrant out of Millburn.

At 9:20 a.m., off-duty Officer John Fabula was working a construction detail on Argyle Place when he saw two individuals asleep in a car. He recognized one of them as Michael Wojcik, 24, of Lodi, who he knew to have outstanding warrants, police said. Fabula contacted on-duty Officer Steven Hroncich, who, after confirming Wojcik’s warrants from Lodi, Mansfield and North Arlington, awakened and arrested him. He was turned over to the custody of the Lodi police.

Vice Unit officers were at Johnston and Grant Aves. at 8 p.m. when their attention was caught by Mario Lamberty, 24, of Kearny, who they said was throwing “numerous” pieces of food on the ground. They then saw him remove a cigar from his pocket and light it. Said cigar was reportedly found to contain marijuana. Lamberty was arrested for possession and use of the drug and possession of drug paraphernalia. He also received a summons for littering.

Aug. 13 

At 10:40 p.m., Vice officers saw Jerry Corrochano, 27, of Kearny enter the passenger side of a car in the area of Patterson St. and Kearny Ave., and, following the vehicle, witnessed what they believed to be a drug transaction. When they stopped the car at Maple St., they reportedly saw the other occupant, Mario Rodrigues, 33, of Kearny, attempt to conceal a plastic bag in his waistband. Police said it contained suspected marijuana. Rodrigues was charged with possession of pot and paraphernalia. Corrochano, who had $40 that was thought to be the proceeds of a drug transaction, was charged with distribution of pot and distribution within a school zone and 500 feet of a playground.

– Karen Zautyk 

Obituaries

Josephine ‘Josie’ Helene Aleniewski 

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Josephine “Josie” Helene Aleniewski, of Rumson, formerly of Harrison, passed away on July 22. She will be missed by family and friends including Brighton Gardens of Middletown and Brandywine of Shrewsbury.

A memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30 at 10:30 a.m. in Holy Cross Parish, 30 Ward Ave., Rumson. For directions, visit holycrossrumson. org. For more information, call Mulligan Funeral Home at 973-481-4333.

Donations may be made to The Foundation for PSP, better known as PSP.org, or Our Lady of Czestochowa Church, Harrison, Kosciuszko Foundation, New York, Piast Institute, Hamtramck, Mich., or Marymount Manhattan College, N.Y.

Julia Elizabeth McGinn 

Julia Elizabeth McGinn entered into eternal rest on Friday, Aug. 8. She was 28. Funeral services were under the direction of the Mulligan Funeral Home, 331 Cleveland Ave., Harrison. A funeral Mass was held at Queen of Peace Church, North Arlington. Her cremation was private.

For information, please visit www.mulliganfuneralhome.org.

Born in Belleville, she lived most of her life in Kearny.

Julia was the loving mother of Jayden and Dylan Morales, she was the beloved daughter of Michael McGinn and Donna Zarpaylic (nee Frank) and dear sister of Danielle Zarpaylic. She is also survived by her caring aunts and uncles Linda Crawford, Maryanne Carson (Gregg), John (Luzia) and Mark McGinn, and her cherished grandparents John and Maureen Frank and John McGinn.

She was predeceased by her grandmother Shelia McGinn (2013).

Prepping for opening

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By Ron Leir
Observer Correspondent 

KEARNY – 

When the bell rings for the opening of classes at the newly reconfigured Lincoln Middle School in Kearny Sept. 4, everything will be ready for the incoming seventh- and eighth-graders, said Acting Superintendent Patricia Blood.

Last week, after the school district completed its summer school and Ticket-to- Read programs at Lincoln, maintenance staff cleaned classrooms on the building’s second floor to prepare them for the estimated 441 grade 8 students who will be their new occupants.

“Our custodial staff has been phenomenal,” Blood said. “Everything should be up to snuff when school resumes.” Read more »

Eyesore will soon be gone

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By Ron Leir
Observer Correspondent

 KEARNY – 

At the top of the Oval, there’s a small square which, in about a month, should be flat.

Yes, the fenced-off, vacant two-story house at 484 Schuyler Ave. surrounded by overgrown vegetation, with a shed in the backyard, is coming down.

The building – next to the entrance of Kearny’s Gunnell Oval recreation complex – has been sitting empty for at least a decade, according to town Public Works Director Gerry Kerr, and now that the town is aiming to make over the environmentally compromised Oval, it will be removing the adjacent eyesore.

Its last owner was listed in Kearny tax records as Matilda Dorothy Horn. Read more »

Vehicular homicide charge in fatal crash

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A Union City truck driver has been charged with vehicular homicide in connection with a N.J. Turnpike crash that claimed the life of a Kearny man in June.

The N.J. State Police, working with the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office, arrested Henry Flores, 55, without incident at his home July 31.

Detectives reportedly have determined that Flores was using a cell phone when his tractor-trailer caused the chain-reaction accident on the Turnpike in Carlstadt. Several people were injured, and Jeffrey Humphrey, 43, was pronounced dead at the scene.

Humphrey, a lifelong Kearny resident, was a medical technology instructor at Montefiore Medical Center and was also the leader of a musical group, The Jeff Humphrey Trio. He was the brother of Kearny Public Library director Josh Humphrey.

The accident occurred at approximately 4:55 p.m., June 9, in the southbound lanes of the highway and resulted in its closure for about eight hours.

Police said Flores was traveling in the left lane when he smashed into the vehicle in front of him that was slowing with traffic. The initial impact caused a crash that involved multiple vehicles. Humphrey’s car was in the middle of the line of cars that were hit.

In addition to vehicular homicide, Flores has been charged with hindering apprehension, reckless driving and improper use of a cell phone.

He was remanded to the Bergen County Jail in lieu of $50,000 full cash bail.

 – Karen Zautyk  

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