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Happy Thanksgiving!

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More apartments eyed for Bergen Ave.

By Ron Leir  Observer Correspondent  KEARNY –  Carlstadt builder Ed Russo is looking to expand a residential development project already in progress in a Kearny redevelopment area at Bergen and Schuyler Aves. Russo told The Observer last month he has a contract to purchase an additional 2.25 acres of […]

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Local taxes up again in borough

By Ron Leir  Observer Correspondent  NORTH ARLINGTON –  Borough residents should be getting their property tax bills by the first week of December, CFO Steve Sanzari said last Thursday, after the Borough Council finally adopted the 2014 municipal budget. Passage of the budget, introduced back in July, has […]

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Vets’ photos wanted for ‘Wall of Honor’

By Karen Zautyk  Observer Correspondent  NUTLEY –  This township, which has been in the forefront when it comes to offering support and assistance and recognition to veterans, has launched yet another project to pay tribute to the men and women who have served our nation. This time, going […]

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Carved in stone

    Photo by Karen Zautyk On Veterans Day, the Township of Kearny added this new memorial to Monument Park on Kearny Ave. It will commemorate local members of the armed forces who make the supreme sacrifice in the War on Terrorism. […]

 
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Three local girls’ soccer teams move on

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By Jim Hague 

Observer Sports Writer 

Three local girls’ high school soccer teams have all advanced to their respective NJSIAA state sectional playoff semifinals that were slated to be played after press time Monday.

The Kearny High School girls advanced to the North Jersey Section 1, Group IV sectional semifinals with a dominant 11-0 win over Bergen Tech last Friday. That win came on the heels of a 5-0 win over North Bergen in the first round.

In the win over Bergen Tech, Lily Durning erupted for four goals, her best performance to date. Barbara Paiva, who was named the Hudson County Interscholastic League Player of the Year earlier last week, had two goals and an amazing five assists. Breeana Costa had three goals and Amanda Eustice had two for the winners, who were slated to face Montclair Tuesday in the sectional semis.

Nutley advanced to the North 2, Group III semifinals with a 5-1 win over Woodbridge. In that game, Victoria Kealy had three goals, including her 76th career goal, becoming the all-time leading goal scorer in the history of the school. Samantha Chimento and Kaitlyn Salisbury each scored a goal and Zoe Steck had three assists.

The Maroon Raiders were slated to face nemesis West Morris in the sectional semifinals Tuesday. West Morris knocked Nutley out of the state playoffs a year ago, so revenge was certainly on the minds of the Maroon Raiders entering that showdown.

And Lyndhurst steamrolled its way into the North Jersey Section 2, Group I semifinals with an 8-0 victory over neighboring rival North Arlington. The Golden Bears won their first state playoff game over Weehawken by a 7-0 score.

In the win over North Arlington, Mia Luna had three goals and Giana DiTonto had two goals and two assists. The top-seeded Golden Bears were slated to face fifth seed Glen Ridge in the sectional semifinals Tuesday.

Needless to say, it has been an excellent season for the local girls’ soccer teams.

Voters: ‘Yes’ to KHS move

A school-related nonbinding public question took the spotlight last Tuesday in East Newark’s voting booths where residents were asked whether they’d prefer to send their children to Kearny High School instead of Harrison High School, where East Newark kids have gone for more than a century.

And the answer was overwhelmingly, “Yes.” A total of 157 residents (machine and absentees) preferred the Kearny High scenario while 52 wanted to stay with the existing arrangement.

The borough Board of Education is expected now to take the next step: forwarding a legal consultant’s feasibility study in support of the shift to the state Commissioner of Education for final review. East Newark Mayor Joseph Smith has pushed for the change for economic reasons, saying that higher tuition fees assessed by the Harrison school board are driving borough school taxes upwards.

East Newark’s municipal election was a quiet affair – in contrast to the bitterlyfought primary contest – with incumbent Borough Council members Hans Peter Lucas and Jeanne Zincavage reelected to 3-year terms and Kenneth Sheehan, who was appointed to the seat formerly held by Edward Serafin, who resigned, was elected to complete the balance of Serafin’s unexpired term.

Elsewhere, four members of the Kearny Town Council running on the Democratic slate were all voted into office in last Tuesday’s general election. They faced no opposition.

Incumbents Albino Cardoso, Eileen Eckel and Susan McCurrie retained their seats in the First, Third and Fourth Wards, respectively, while newcomer Jonathan Giordano took over for incumbent Laura Cifelli Pettigrew, who opted not to seek re-election.

All four candidates are aligned with Mayor Alberto Santos and the Kearny Regular Democratic Organization.

There was a bit more excitement in the Kearny Board of Education contest, which featured five candidates battling for three seats.

The victors were: newcomers James L. Hill, who led the way with 1,184 votes, and Mercedes Davidson, 1,126; and incumbent Sebastian Viscuso, 1,107. All three were running as a team. Incumbent John Plaugic Jr. polled 941 votes and challenger Oscar Omar Fernandez got 604. Incumbent John Leadbeater didn’t run.

In Belleville, a two-member “team” held sway in the Board of Education race as Patricia Dolan and Ralph Vellon – who were backed by the Voice of Teachers in Education, a political action committee for Belleville teachers – topped a field of five for the two seats available.

The vote, with absentees included, was as follows: Dolan, 2,067; Vellon, 1,759; Christine Lamparello, 1,345; Gabrielle Bennett, 741; and Erika Jacho, 295. Incumbent William Freda didn’t seek re-election and incumbent Joseph Longo resigned after he was elected to the Township Commission.

In Lyndhurst, three candidates running as the “Kids First for Lyndhurst team” won seats on the Board of Education, in the process knocking out two incumbents. James Vuono (1,899 votes, including absentees), Beverly Alberti (1,877) and board president Christopher Musto (1,449) outpaced incumbents Stephen Vendola (1,381) and Josephine Malaniak (1,084) and challenger Jeremy Guenter (443).

And in Nutley, incumbents Lisa Danchak-Martin, Salvatore Ferraro and Frederick Scalera were returned to their seats on the Board of Education with no opposition.

– Ron Leir 

Obituaries

Adela Asensi 

Adela Asensi died peacefully at home on Nov. 4.

Born in La Coruna, Spain, she lived in Kearny for the past 48 years.

Arrangements were by the Armitage Wiggins Funeral Home, 596 Belgrove Drive, Kearny. A funeral Mass was held at St. Stephen’s Church, followed by entombment in Holy Cross Cemetery.

Adela had been a factory worker for the Ladies Garment District in Newark. She was the sister of Maria Elena Camporeale and the late Olga Garcia, Macu Trueva, Isa Panetta, Jose Luis, Finita, Ceasar and Pastor Asensi.

Grace Ann Bioty 

Memorial visitation for Grace Ann Bioty was held Saturday, Nov. 8, at the Armitage Wiggins Funeral Home, 596 Belgrove Drive, Kearny. Grace is survived by her husband Stephen and her children James Bioty and Michelle Olawski as well as her grandchildren.

Dr. Charles R. Bridge 

Dr. Charles R. Bridge died peacefully, surrounded by his loving family, on Nov. 5. He was 70.

Born in Kearny, he moved to Manahawkin 10 years ago.

Arrangements were by the Armitage Wiggins Funeral Home, 596 Belgrove Drive, Kearny. A funeral service was held at the funeral home, followed by a private cremation.

Chuck was a beloved dentist in Kearny for many years and was an avid boater. He also served in the Air Force during Vietnam.

He is survived by his daughter Lisa Lipesky, twin brother David R. Bridge, his grandchildren Michael and Alyssa, his nephews and nieces David Bridge, Allison Bridge Clemens, Micki Bridge, Natalie and Kyleigh. He is also survived by his dear cousin Ruth Wiseman and devoted friend Evelyn Carson.

In lieu of flowers, kindly consider a donation to the American Cancer Society.

Margaret M. Calero 

Margaret M. Calero (nee O’Grady) died Nov. 2. She was 53.

Born in Newark, she lived in Kearny since 1986.

Arrangements are by the Armitage Wiggins Funeral Home, 596 Belgrove Drive, Kearny. A funeral Mass was held at St. Cecilia’s Church, followed by burial in Holy Cross Cemetery.

Margaret was a hairdresser at Velvet Salon in Lyndhurst.

She was the wife of Francell Calero, daughter of Joan and the late John O’Grady, mother of Marcus, Brittany, Danielle and Stephanie, and sister of Doreen Demerest, Joan Slozen, Bill Huetelle, Rosemary Kaufman, Patricia Madarro, Michael O’Grady and the late Steven and John O›Grady. Also surviving are her beloved aunt and uncle Maryann and Richard Kennel. She was also aunt to many nieces and nephews.

In lieu of flowers, kindly consider a donation to Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.

William Henry 

William Henry passed away on Sept. 4 at Clara Maass Medical Center, Belleville.

Bill worked for Hudson County Parks and Recreation for nearly 30 years.

He leaves behind many loving family and friends.

Arrangements were under the direction of Mulligan Funeral Home, 331 Cleveland Ave., Harrison. His cremation was private and there were no other services. For information or to send condolences to the family go to: www.mulliganfh.com.

Dolores Hesketh 

Dolores Hesketh, 84, of Summerville, S.C., formerly a resident of Kearny, passed away on Oct. 14 at Summerville Medical Center with her family at her side.

Surviving is her husband of 65 years, Jack; her children, the Rev. John, Patricia (Isidro), Ed (Sheila), Lori (George) and Beth (Tony). She was predeceased by her daughter Kathy. She is also survived by 12 grandchildren, Laura, Tony, Erin, Megan, Danny, Devin, Colleen, Joey, Nikki, A.J., Erica and Danielle; one great-grandson Avery; brother-in-law Frank and sister-in-law Carol; brother Bill and sister-in-law Pam, many nieces and nephews and her dear friends in South Carolina.

Services were held at Simplicity Crematorium, Charleston, S.C. An amazing wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and friend, she was the best. She will be missed by all who had the pleasure to know her.

Alfred Joll 

Alfred Joll, of Kearny, died Nov. 3 at Hackensack Medical Center. He was 69.

Arrangements were by the Armitage and Wiggins Funeral Home, 596 Belgrove Drive, Kearny. A funeral Mass was held at Our Lady of Sorrows Church, followed by burial in Holy Cross Cemetery with his first wife Lorraine (nee Humanick).

Al was a heavy equipment operator for Roselli and had been a laborer in the town of Kearny. He was a 4th degree Knight of Columbus.

He is survived by his current wife Jacqueline and his children, Theresa Barron (David) and Michael Joll (Holly). He was the brother of Joseph, Frank, Fred, Linda, Geraldine, Emma, Anna and the late Robert. Also surviving are his grandchildren Cassandra Henriques and David Barron III.

Wellness events at Lyndhurst ShopRite

Throughout November (Diabetes Awareness Month), ShopRite of Lyndhurst, an Inserra Supermarkets store, will host a full roster of health and wellness programs, led by Julie Harrington, in-store registered dietitian.

All programs are free and open to the public and will be held at the store at 540 New York Ave. Unless otherwise noted, advance registration is not required.

• The Weekly Walking Club  continues on Thursdays, Nov. 13 and 20. This one-mile trek through the store begins at Dietitian’s Corner at 8 a.m. Membership cards and prizes are awarded to all participants.

• The CarePoint Health van  will offer free blood pressure and cholesterol screenings Thursday, Nov. 13, from noon to 4 p.m. No appointment necessary.

• On Diabetes Health Day,  Sunday, Nov. 16, free glucose testing and vascular screenings will be available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. No appointment necessary. A Healthy Thanksgiving Cooking Class — explaining how to prep the turkey and stay guilt-free throughout the holiday season — is set for Thursday, Nov. 20, from 1 to 2 p.m.

• LiveRight with ShopRite  Kids’ Day Cooking Class, for ages 6 and up, teaches youngsters how to prepare a simple, healthy snack. It will be held Tuesday, Nov. 25, from 4 to 5 p.m. Space is limited, and preregistration is required.

• Stop by Dietitian’s Corner  all day Wednesday, Nov. 26, for last-minute tips on staying healthy through the holiday season.

ShopRite’s dietitians can serve as guest speakers/instructors at wellness events hosted by local organizations.

For more information or to pre-register for a program, contact Harrington at 201- 419-9154 or email Julie.harrington@  wakefern.com.

Then & Now

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Photo by Karen Zautyk Top: Town of Harrison

Above Photo by Karen Zautyk
Top: Town of Harrison

Our last ‘Then & Now’ featured a 1930 Harrison photo of N. 4th St. (now Frank E. Rodgers Blvd.) viewed from Harrison Ave. This is the same spot, as pictured in an antique postcard. The card is undated, but it obviously predates the 1930 scene by decades. Our guess is that it’s from the 1890s or early 1900s, which we surmise based on the clothing of the pedestrians, including a woman, just visible at far left, in a ground-sweeping dress and wide-brimmed hat. What we find  most intriguing is the emptiness. Where is everyone? There’s just a handful of people and no vehicles at all. Not a wagon, horse-drawn carriage or trolley in sight, although the tracks are evidence that trolleys do travel here. Was Harrison closed that day? 

We thought it might be difficult to stand in the street to take the ‘Now’ photo, considering how heavy traffic is these days. But . . . where  is everyone? 

– Karen Zautyk 

Kearny’s main library to close Monday through Wednesday for emergency repairs

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The Kearny Public Library’s main facility at 318 Kearny Ave. is closing for emergency heating repairs, from Monday, Nov. 10, to Wednesday, Nov. 12.

All programs scheduled for those days are canceled, including Story Time, Child’s Cooking Class and Book Discussion Group.

Library Director Josh Humphrey said the library’s generator – a converted coal-fired furnace that is at least 70 years old – “has been on its last legs” for a while and “leaking water.”

Core Mechanical of Pennsauken will install a new boiler, Humphrey said. He was unable to provide the cost estimate for the job but said that the money would come from the library’s unreserved emergency funds.

Meanwhile, on Nov. 10 and 12, the Branch Library, 759 Kearny Ave., will offer extended hours: from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

– Ron Leir

A harrowing history lesson

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By Ron Leir 

Observer Correspondent 

BELLEVILLE – 

Erwin Ganz was only nine when he fled Germany in 1939, thereby escaping the Holocaust, but his memories of that terrifying time are still fresh. Ganz, who resettled in America, went to Weequahic High School in Newark and Seton Hall University for an accounting degree, shared those memories at an assembly program hosted by Belleville High School last Thursday.

Since retiring from The Ronson Corp. after a 60-year career in 2009, Ganz has visited more than 40 schools, colleges, churches and synagogues, to tell his story.

Young people, especially, he said, “need to know what happened during the Hitler regime because when I’m gone [along with other survivors], the only way to find out is from books.”

In February 1933, Ganz explained to the Belleville students, “Hitler came to power and blamed the Jews” for Germany’s economic ills: rampant inflation and high unemployment. When he was five, Ganz said, his father “lost his job as a bank executive in Frankfort because he was a Jew,” and the family moved 100 miles away to Berncastel- Kues where his grandmother owned a small department store and his dad worked there.

Famous for its vineyards and wine production and an ancient castle atop a hill, “it was like a fairy tale town,” Ganz said.

But below the surface lurked the political realities of the day: “There were no more than 30 Jewish families there and the local public school refused to enroll me because I was Jewish – there was rampant anti-Semitism.”

His parents found a Jewish school – 35 miles away in Willich – and Ganz and his brother commuted there and back by train. When they’d walk out of the train station, they’d be “harassed by the Hitler Youth who, on occasion, stole our books” as police stood by and “did nothing.”

Document/photo courtesy Erwin Ganz At l., Gestapo registry of Jewish families, including Ganz, which he acquired from a Nazi historian on a return visit to Germany 50 years later. At r., Ganz as a boy, sitting between his mother and brother.

Document/photo courtesy Erwin Ganz
At l., Gestapo registry of Jewish families, including Ganz, which he acquired from a Nazi historian on a return visit to Germany 50 years later. At r., Ganz as a boy, sitting between his mother and brother.

 

It was during this period, he said, that “Jewish men were taken from their homes and beaten on the streets” and the German state secret police, known as the Gestapo, placed signs on Jewish-owned businesses, reading: “Do Not Buy From Jews.”

One morning in March 1938, Ganz recalls being told by his mother that, “my dad left in the middle of the night to escape the Nazis who were looking for him.” He later learned that an American relative had agreed to “sponsor” his dad’s admission to the U.S. by placing money in an escrow account. Armed with that information, Ganz’s father managed to scrape up enough money for a passage to the U.S.

Only after he had set sail did word arrive in Germany that the aged relative had died. But a Jewish aid society arranged for shelter and work for Ganz’s dad in the U.S.

Back in Germany, meanwhile, Ganz recalled returning home from school on Nov. 9, 1938, on an “overcast and gray” day and was surprised to see his mother waiting for him at the station.

“She was holding a banana, which was considered a delicacy in Germany then, and she gave it to me as a distraction from the terrible sight I saw when we got home – windows broken, glass all over the street and front yard – and inside the house, the Nazis had ripped frames, destroyed pictures, slashed sofas and chairs. There were hatchet marks on the door frames. In an upstairs bedroom, coal-fired stoves had been ripped from their foundations and thrown on the beds.”

Similar signs of destruction at Jewish homes and businesses – including Ganz’s grandmother’s store – were everywhere, he said. It came to be known as Kristallnacht – the Night of Broken Glass – when, around Germany, paramilitary units looted several thousand Jewish-owned shops, burned hundreds of synagogues and began roundups of Jews bound for Nazi concentration camps.

At his grandmother’s store, Ganz said that many of the Nazi Youth involved in laying waste to the business “were children of customers who shopped there,” but their parents were reluctant to stop them “because they were afraid they’d be turned in to the Gestapo by their children.”

Photo by Ron Leir Belleville students presented a pair of sneakers as a gift to Ganz, who walks a mile and a half every morning.

Photo by Ron Leir
Belleville students presented a pair of
sneakers as a gift to Ganz, who walks
a mile and a half every morning.

 

The Gestapo came to Ganz’s house “to take my father away,” Ganz said, but, luckily, he’d already fled to the U.S.

Conditions continued to worsen: From a tavern next door to the Ganzs’ house, “every night, we could hear the Nazis singing about killing Jews,” he said. The Jewish school in Willich “was destroyed.” The Nazis confiscated jewelry held by Jews who, by then, feared leaving their homes.

Things got so bad, said Ganz, that “our devoted housekeeper, who was Catholic, brought us food in the middle of the night.”

In April 1939, Ganz, his brother and mother left for the U.S. aboard the ship, the Franklin D. Roosevelt, and in 1940, his grandmother followed. “She got out on the last boat that left Germany,” he said.

When he made his first return visit to Germany in 1974, Ganz visited his old home in Berncastel-Kues and the new owner – after being assured that Ganz wasn’t going to try and reclaim the property – showed him around. “I could still see the hatchet indentations made by the Nazis in 1938,” he said.

On the site of his grandmother’s store was a tavern; the town’s synagogue had been converted to a machine shop – “but,” Ganz said, “you could still see the Star of David on top” – and, in Willich, the synagogue “was still standing” but a sign outside said it was a “Jewish Museum.”

The attendant gave Ganz a tour of the building and spoke about the onetime Jewish presence “as if it was something that happened a long time ago.”

“I would never live in Germany again,” Ganz told the students. “America is the best country in the world. America saved my life and my parents’ lives and I would do anything for it.”

Fire OT prompts hirings

By Ron Leir 

Observer Correspondent 

KEARNY – 

After meeting in closed caucus for about an hour last Wednesday, Kearny’s governing body came out with what Mayor Alberto Santos later characterized as a commitment to hire 12 additional firefighters … if the town’s state fiscal monitor goes along.

And town officials are pledged to do that, Santos said, even if Kearny fails to secure outside funding sources – in particular, the federal SAFER (Staffing for Adequate Fire & Emergency Response) grant – to help subsidize the cost.

In the recent past, the town has been hesitant to hire any new uniformed employees without that outside cash, insisting that it has been operating under severe budgetary restraints.

But now, Santos said, the Fire Department roster has dipped to the degree that overtime expenses to cover for ailing or injured firefighters and fire superiors have climbed to alarming levels, to the point where the town has essentially no choice but to replenish the ranks.

“We’re going to hit close to $1 million in Fire Department overtime – for both the rank and file and for officers – for the year,” the mayor said, “and we have a recommendation from both the fire chief and CFO that if we hire 12 additional firefighters, we will actually see a savings with a big reduction in overtime.”

With the new personnel, Santos said, each of the department’s four shifts can be supplemented by three firefighters, thereby expanding coverage and more bodies available to fill gaps when needed.

Implementing the new hires, according to Santos, would mean an investment of approximately $600,000 – calculated on the basis of about $30,000 in salary plus an average of $20,000 in health benefits per firefighter per year.

But Santos said that some of that cost would be offset by retirements of veteran uniformed employees anticipated in both the Police and Fire Departments during the next couple of years.

As part of the plan, the mayor said the town would “implement monthly overtime reporting to track projected savings in overtime.”

If, for whatever reason, however, the plan doesn’t produce those savings, Santos said the town may have to close another fire company, as it did a few years ago.

Asked if the town would consider – as a possible savings strategy – renegotiating firefighters’ work schedule, Santos said that wouldn’t happen because the issue was previously arbitrated in the unions’ favor.

At any rate, assuming the state monitor signs off on the plan for extra hirings, Santos said the next step would be for the town to ask the state Civil Service Commission to certify a new firefighter appointment list.

Reached this week, Fire Chief Steve Dyl said: “Yes, we looked at our overtime for 2013 and 2014 and we figured that if we put a few more [firefighters] on, we’d have better balance and put a dent in the O.T.”

Dyl said he’s still facing a falloff in personnel, having lost three firefighters this year through retirement. “If we get the 12 [new appointees], that will put me at 56 – and, with superiors, it will come to 96 total,” he said. That will still fall short of the 102 total called for under the department’s T.O.

“We’ll try to get the new people into the training academy by March [2015] so we have them on the streets before July 1,” Dyl said.

Meanwhile, Santos said the town is also planning to hire more police officers to strengthen thinned ranks. To that end, he said that Civil Service has asked the Police Department to verify residencies of the people on the current appointment list. He declined to say how many cops might be hired.

The mayor and council have also agreed to go along with Public Works Superintendent Gerry Kerr’s recommendation to hire three “seasonal” workers for six months of the year. The monitor has consented to this proposal, Santos said.

A request from the Health Department for a replacement senior citizen bus driver has yet to be discussed, the mayor said.

Sober House ordered to pack up

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By Ron Leir 

Observer Correspondent 

KEARNY – 

Occupants of the so-called Sober House at 2-8 Grand Place in Kearny faced a court order to vacate the building on or before 5 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 4.

Hudson County Superior Court Judge Hector R. Velazquez, sitting in Jersey City, so ordered last Friday after determining “that immediate or irreparable harm will result” from property owner Jacqueline Lopes “operating or permitting others to operate a rooming/boarding house” in a single-family residential zone.

An inspection of the property conducted by the state Department of Community Affairs’ Bureau of Rooming & Boarding House Standards on Oct. 6 found that eight people were living in the house. Angelo J. Mureo, an enforcement field supervisor with the bureau, concluded that, “the property is currently operating as an unlicensed Class C boarding house.” The house can hold up to nine residents, Mureo determined.

Among “concerns regarding physical plant,” Mureo recommends removal of two entry doors, “one providing access to the third story attic area housing a rooming unit to accommodate two roomers and the other housing a sitting room.”

He also says the bureau has received “no certificate of smoke detector and carbon monoxide alarm compliance, issued by the designated Uniform Fire Code enforcing agency….”

The judge will allow Lopes to explain why the occupants of the house should be allowed to stay – but not until a hearing set for Dec. 12 at 11:30 a.m. in Jersey City.

On a separate legal front, Lopes and Charles Valentine, who runs the Sober House operation, have been summoned to appear in Kearny Municipal Court Nov. 13 at 10:30 a.m. Lopes faces fines totaling $8,000 dating from Sept. 5 for “changing the use” of the property while Valentine is charged with failing to get a certificate of occupancy for a rooming house, dating from Sept. 8.

As of last week, it was unclear what, if anything, Lopes or Valentine would do to prevent the vacate order from being carried out.

According to complaints filed by Kearny with Superior Court, Lopes acquired the Grand Place property around May 2014 and received a C.O. for its “continued use” as a “one-family dwelling.” But, the complaint notes, Lopes “is being paid $1,900 per month to illegally operate, or to permit others to illegally operate, a boarding house on the premises.”

This contention, the town says in its complaint, is borne out by the state inspection report.

And because the Valentine House accommodates “recovering drug and alcohol addicts,” that is “of particular concern to the town because the Roosevelt Elementary School is approximately 100 feet from the premises,” the complaint says.

Further, the complaint says, Lopes “has not applied to the town for a variance to use the premises as a rooming/boarding house [and] is not licensed by the [state] as a rooming/ boarding house operator ….” and that she “misrepresented that she would occupy the premises as her sole residence.”

Fairfield attorney Gregory Castano Jr., the town’s general counsel, argued in the complaints that, “The town has a statutorily mandated obligation to enforce the state and local zoning laws. Every single day that Ms. Lopes is permitted to operate an illegal rooming/ boarding house at the [Grand Place] premises is a flagrant, continuing and ongoing injury for which the town – which represents the general public interest – has no other remedy.”

Lopes couldn’t be reached and reportedly had no legal representative at last week’s court session. Valentine’s attorney Thomas J. Cotton was unavailable last week.

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By Ron Leir 

Observer Correspondent

NEWARK –

The federal trial of Kearny Board of Education member John Leadbeater, accused of taking part in a conspiracy to defraud banks of $13 million in mortgage proceeds, has been delayed three months – at the government’s request. The trial of Leadbeater, a former Kearny councilman, is now on for March 2 before Judge Ann Marie Donio in Camden federal court.

Leadbeater’s Jersey City attorney Thomas J. Cammarata raised no objection to the government’s petition. The case had been set for trial early next month but on Oct. 8, government lawyers asked U.S. District Court Chief Judge Jerome B. Simandle to designate it as a “complex case,” and, as such, the government gets more time to prepare.

“Complex case or litigation,” as explained by the National Center for State Courts website, is a legal term of art referring to the types of cases “requiring more intensive judicial management. Complexity may be determined by multiple parties, multiple attorneys, geographically dispersed plaintiffs and defendants, numerous expert witnesses, complex subject matter, complicated testimony concerning causation, procedural complexity, complex substantive law, extensive discovery [among other factors].”

On Oct. 21, Judge Simandle granted the government’s request, noting that, “This case involves allegations of conspiracy to commit wire fraud over a period of several years and conspiracy to commit money laundering over a period several years.”

Further, the judge found that, “The discovery in the case is voluminous, in that it includes the documents relevant to approximately 30 real estate transactions occurring between 2006 through 2008.”

Initially, the government – represented by Asst. U.S. Attorney Jacqueline M. Carle – had sought the move the trial from Dec. 1, 2014, to Feb. 2, 2015, “and to exclude the intervening period of time under the [70-day] Speedy Trial Act to allow trial counsel for the government to prepare for trial.”

In response, Cammarata asked for a March date “due to scheduling conflicts,” to which the judge consented, agreeing to make the same exception for the intervening time for the defense.

In March 2013, Leadbeater, 54, was charged with Daniel Cardillo, 49, of Wildwood, in a federal indictment with conspiracy to commit wire fraud in connection with an alleged scheme to recruit straw buyers (Cardillo included) to buy oceanfront condominiums “overbuilt by financially distressed developers in Wildwood and Wildwood Crest.”

According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the straw buyers “had good credit scores but lacked the financial resources to qualify for the mortgage loans.” Leadbeater and other co-conspirators allegedly “created … fake employment records, W-2 forms and investment statements to make the straw buyers appear more creditworthy than they actually were to induce the lenders to make the loans,” the feds alleged.

“Once the loans were approved and the mortgage lenders sent the loan proceeds in connection with real estate closings on the properties, Leadbeater and his conspirators took a portion of the proceeds, having funds wired or checks deposited into various accounts they controlled,” the government alleged.

If convicted of wire fraud conspiracy, Leadbeater could be sentenced to up to 30 years in prison and fined up to $1 million.

Leadbeater co-defendant Cardillo was severed from his alleged co-conspirator and will stand trial after Leadbeater, according to U.S. Attorney’s Office spokeswoman Rebeka Carmichael. They are the two remaining defendants in the feds’ sweeping mortgage fraud case involving at least 11 other alleged conspirators.

Seven of those defendants – Justin Spradley, 35, of Cincinnati, Ohio; Robert Horton, 37, of Nashport, Ohio; Paul Watterson, 53, of Mountainside; Michelle Martinez, 49, of Brick; Ernesto Rodriguez, Matthew Gardner and Steven Schlatmann, 27, of Jersey City – have each pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire fraud and their sentences are pending, Carmichael said.

Four defendants – John Bingaman, 44, of Benton, Ark.; Dana Rummerfield, 47, of Los Angeles; Debra Hanson, 49, of Voorhees; and Angela Celli, 42, of Somerset, Mass. – have also entered guilty pleas relative to the case and also await sentencing, she said.

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